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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 16 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 30 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 5 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 2 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 4 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Rutledge or search for Rutledge in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

e body, composed of the best talent in the State, was temporarily organized with John C. Pelot, of Alachua, as chairman, and B. G. Pringle, of Gadsden, as secretary. After an address by Mr. Pelot, the proceedings were opened with prayer by Bishop Rutledge. The names of the members of the convention, and the counties and districts they represented, are here preserved: John Morrison, A. L. McCaskill, of Walton; Freeman B. Irwin, of Washington; Richard D. Jordan, R. R. Golden, of Holmes; S. Sy to ratify the ordinance and invite their attendance. Governor Perry, suffering an attack of sickness, could not be present at the signing of the ordinance, and his place was filled by the Hon. John Milton, governor-elect. After prayer by Bishop Rutledge the convention signed the ordinance before the assembled citizens of Florida, after which the president declared that the State of Florida was a free and independent State, and that all political connection between her and the existing gover
, and on January 12, 1861, the flag was lowered at the navy yard, which, with all the fortifications and munitions of war on the mainland, went into the possession of the State. The two vessels in the harbor, the Supply and Wyandotte, steamed out, remaining in the possession of the United States officers. The eighty men under Slemmer at Fort Pickens maintained a defiant attitude. On the night of the 12th a deputation went to the fort, consisting of Captain Randolph, Major Marks and Lieutenant Rutledge, and demanded the peaceable surrender of Pickens to the governors of Alabama and Florida, but Slemmer declined to recognize the authority of those officials. On the next night a small party of armed men from the mainland reconnoitered on the island, and a few shots were fired from the fort. On the 15th Col. W. H. Chase, who as an officer of the United States army had built the forts and was thoroughly familiar with all the defenses about Pensacola bay, visited Pickens in company wit