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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
delicate subject, the Sabbath, was alluded to in connexion with my review of Dr. Beecher's speech, there was but one feeling manifested toward me, and that of the most enthusiastic kind. What was peculiarly pleasing was to find men of various sects joining in one common panegyric. Among the speakers were Rev. Mr. Norris, Methodist; Isaac Samuel Norris. R. B. Hall. Alanson St. Clair. S. J. May. Henry B. Stanton. George W. Benson. Winslow, Friend; Rev. Mr. Hall, Congregationalist; Rev. Mr. St. Clair, Unitarian, etc., etc. Amasa Walker said that the success of the Liberator was identified with that of the cause. Even now the enemy was exultant because the Liberator was languishing for want of support. It ought to be adopted as the centre, the organ of the Society. We do not all feel perfectly pleased with all Mr. Garrison says. Like Martin Luther, his language is rough and sometimes violent. But Mr. Birney has said, My anti-slavery trumpet would never have roused the countr
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
Is this a visionary or impracticable plan, or is it founded on a principle you disapprove? The idea has originated wholly with myself, and I am uncertain whether it will be approved by any one; but I have felt so anxious that the cause of strife may be avoided that I would make any sacrifice, save one of principle, to prevent it. I know you will excuse the liberty I take in so freely bringing forward my views. P. S. The above was written on Sunday evening. Since then Messrs. Phelps and St. Clair have been at Weymouth, and A. A. Phelps, A. St. Clair. their incidental remarks have served to increase my fear that the Liberator will be seriously injured unless something be done to prevent it. I desire the Liberator, and the Liberator only, to be the organ of the anti-slavery party in Massachusetts. Many plans have been on foot for its subversion, but have failed because they had no basis. I fear you are furnishing one if the Liberator becomes a peace paper in part. Such was the