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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 24 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for I. M. Saint John or search for I. M. Saint John in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
he materials for making gun powder, search was made for nitre earth, and considerable quantities were obtained from caves in Tennessee, Georgia and North Alabama, as also from old buildings, cellars, plantation quarters and tobacco barns. Col. I. M. St. John was, in 1862, given separate charge of this work, and developed it systematically on a large scale. He also established artificial nitre beds at Columbia and Charleston, S. C., Augusta and Savannah, Ga., Selma and Mobile, Ala., and elsewhally important results were produced in 1862 and ‘63 in the development of the iron ores of the country, particularly in Alabama, unconsciously laying the foundation for this great industry as it now exists. The Nitre and Mining Bureau under Col. St. John, partly by its own officers and partly through contractors, opened mines, erected furnaces and rolling mills, and turned out large quantities of iron of superior quality. But before this work had got well underway much care was taken in the