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Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 12 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 6 0 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 6 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 2 0 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 17: military character. (search)
cepted battle on the field of Waterloo and taken up the line of defense adopted by Wellington. He would not have compressed sixtyseven thousand six hundred and sixty-one Number of English troops engaged at Waterloo. men in battle lines within a space of two miles on the Wavre road, on a slope void of intrenchments. The chateau of Hougoumont and its inclosures might have been strongly occupied to add increased strength to the right of the line of battle; but it is improbable that La Haye Sainte, three hundred yards in front of the center on the Charleroi turnpike, and the little villages of Papelotte, La Haie, and Smohain, from a quarter to a half mile in front of the left, would have been occupied except by skirmishers. The flanks of a Federal army equal in numbers to the English would have been twice as far apart, and the whole line well protected by earthworks. Lee would not have attacked as Napoleon did if the Union troops had been placed precisely as Wellington arranged his
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
ry expedition, 364. Kearney, General, Philip, 34, 196. Kelly's Ford, 187. Kelton, General, 197. Keith, Rev., John, 26. Kemper, General, wounded at Gettysburg, 296. Kershaw's division in the Valley, 353- Kershaw, General, captured, 385. Keyes, General E. D., 140, 145. Kilpatrick's cavalry, 266, 270, 315; raid on Richmond, 323. King's division, 191, 192, 193. Kossuth, General, Louis, 423. Lacy House, 229. Lacy, Rev. Dr. B. T., 246. Lafayette, Marquis, 10. La Haye, Sainte, 420. Last cavalry engagement, 393. Latane, Captain, killed, 153. Lawton, General, 130. League of Gileadites, 75. Ledlie, General, 357, 358, 359- Lee, Algernon Sydney, 17. Lee, Anne Hill, 20. Lee, Annie, mentioned, 217, 235. Lee, Cassius F., 29, 30. Lee, Charles Carter, 13, 17. Lee, Charles, 7. Lee, Edmund I., 416. Lee, Francis Lightfoot, 6. Lee genealogy, 21. Lee, General, Fitzhugh, mentioned, 172, 183, 187, 188, 194, 206, 219, 318, 371, 375, 376, 385, 387; letter to
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
sts, and experiences the least check, it may be changed into a complete disaster, since the broken line would be thrown back upon those same obstacles which were believed suited to protect it. This incontestable danger authorizes the belief that posts of an easy defense are better, on a day of battle, than insurmountable obstacles, since it suffices to have posts where we can maintain ourselves for a few hours by the aid of simple detachments. The park of Hougoumont, the hamlet of la Haie-Sainte, and the stream of Papelotte, presented to Ney obstacles more serious than the famous position of Elchingen, where he forced the passage of the Danube in 1805, upon the remnant of a burnt bridge. The courage of the defenders could, in fact, not have been absolutely equal in the two circumstances; but, apart from this chance, it must be owned that the difficulties of a ground, when they are turned to good account. need not be insurmountable, in order to baffle any attack. At Elchingen, the
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army., Example of a battle of the offensive defense: battle of Austerlitz, December 2, 1805. (search)
epared for defense. In the center, near the road, stood a farm, called La Haye Sainte, and likewise prepared for defense. On the left wing were three other farms — four columns are formed for the attack--one on the left of the farm of La Haye Sainte; one on the center of the left wing, between Papelotte and the main road; the t into action at the decisive moment. The first column advances against La Haye Sainte, and takes it. The second column advances through a heavy fire of artillery froavalry, after its success against the English cavalry, advanced against La Haye Sainte, to the spot where the action of the first column took place, which had in the ers, the French columns advance to the right and left of the main road; La Haye Sainte, Papelotte, and Smouhen are carried by the French. Napoleon has just disposed rt of the French army. In the mean time, Ney had redoubled his efforts; Haye Sainte, Papelotte, and Haye are in his undisputed possession. At Papelotte the figh
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 5: Tactics.The twelve orders of battle, with examples of each.—Different Formations of infantry, cavalry, artillery, and engineers on the field of battle, with the Modes of bringing troops into action (search)
satisfied at the same time; and sometimes the very means of satisfying one, may be in direct violation of another. A river, a forest, or a mountain, which secures a flank of a line of battle, may become an obstacle to a retreat, should the defensive forces be thrown back upon that wing. Again, the position may be difficult of attack in front or on the wings, and at the same time unfavorable for retreat. Such was Wellington's position at Waterloo. The park of Hougomont, the hamlet of Haye Sainte, and the marshy rivulet of Papelotte, were serious obstacles against the attacking force; but the marshy forest of Soignies in rear, with but a single road, cut off all hope of retreat. II. According to the strategic relations of the contending forces in a campaign, will it be determined whether we are to await the enemy, or to seek him out and attack him wherever he may be found. We may sometimes be obliged to make the attack at all hazards, for the purpose of preventing the junction o
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 12: army organization—Engineers.—Their history, duties, and organization,—with a brief discussion, showing their importance as a part of a modern army organization. (search)
did much to weaken the French power in the Peninsula. Temporary or field-fortifications also had an important influence here. The lines of Torres-Vedras, the field-works of Ronda, the intrenched camps of the Pyrenees, Bayonne, Toulouse, &c., are examples under this head. In fact, field-works played a most important part in all of Napoleon's wars. We might mention the redoubt of Montenotte, the intrenchments at Milesimo, the batteries of Lobau, the field-defences of Hougomont, La Haye-Sainte, and Papelotte at Waterloo, and numerous other cases equally striking. Just before the battle of Waterloo, Wellington employed some eighteen. thousand peasants and two thousand horses, under the direction of British officers of engineers. In speaking of these defences, Colonel Pasley says: It may be easily conceived that to have directed such a great body of workmen to proper advantage, by means of a few officers of engineers, would have been impossible, but for the system adopted of subdi
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 14: field-engineering.—Field Fortifications.—Military Communications.—Military Bridges.—Sapping, Mining, and the attack and defence of a fortified place (search)
Maigret. Defense d'ancone. Mangourit. Fortification. Marolois. Siege de Turin. Mengin. Recherches sur l'art defensif, &c. Michaloz. La fortification de champagne, &c. Miller. L'art defensif, &c. Montalembert. Journaux des sieges de Flandre. Relations des sieges en Europe, &c. Musset-Pathay. A very valuable and interesting work. Relation du siege de Metz. Relation du siege d'anvers. Les sieges de Jaffa et de St. Jean d'acre. Les sieges de Saragosse et de Tortose. Rogniat. Siege de Dantzick. Sainte-Susanne. Memoire sur la fortification permanent. Sea. Le siege de Constantine. Elemens de fortification. Trincano. Des places fortes. Valaze. Essay on military bridges. Douglas. A valuable work. Guide du pontonier. Drieu. Memoire sur la guerre souterraine. Coutele. Traite des mines. Etienne. Traite de l'art du mineur. Geuss. Traite de fortification souterraine. Gillot. Traite pratique et theorique des mines. Lebrun. Nouveau traite des mines, &c. Prudhomme. Manuel du sapeur Used in the French
care less. Is the German army a machine which does not think? Did the French revolutionary armies know very little what they were fighting for, and care less? Sainte-Beuve says charmingly that he cannot bear to have it said that he is the first in anything; it is not a thing that can be admitted, and these ways of classing peoeen steady enough behind breastworks and entrenchments against regulars, but never in the open field. Why cannot the Americans, in speaking of their nation, take Sainte-Beuve's happy and wise caution? The point is worth insisting on, because to be always seeking to institute comparisons, and comparisons to the advantage of then the character which, quite simply and unconsciously, it draws of Grant himself. The Americans are too self-laudatory, too apt to force the tone and thereby, as Sainte-Beuve says, to give offence; the best way for them to make us forgive and forget this is to produce what is simple and sterling. Instead of Primers of American L
on seem to me quite amazing; and yet the possibilities that lie between inert matter and man's living, all-powerful, immortal soul may make almost anything credible. The soul at times can do anything with matter. I have been busying myself with Sainte-Beuve's seven volumes on the Port Royal development. I like him (Sainte-Beuve). His capacity of seeing, doing justice to all kinds of natures and sentiments, is wonderful. I am sorry he is no longer our side the veil. There is a redbird (carSainte-Beuve). His capacity of seeing, doing justice to all kinds of natures and sentiments, is wonderful. I am sorry he is no longer our side the veil. There is a redbird (cardinal grosbeak) singing in the orange trees fronting my window, so sweetly and insistently as to almost stop my writing. I hope, dear friend, you are well — better than when you wrote last. It was very sweet and kind of you to write what you did last. I suppose it is so long ago you may have forgotten, but it was a word of tenderness and sympathy about my brother's trial; it was womanly, tender, and sweet, such as at heart you are. After all, my love of you is greater than my admiration, f
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
right also when he suggested that Holmes's serious poetry had scarcely been the serious work of his life. Even at its best this serious poetry is the result of his intelligence rather than of his imagination. It lacks depth of feeling and largeness of vision. It has a French felicity of fancy, a French dexterity of craftsmanship, a French point and polish; and also a French inadequacy of emotion. Assuredly we love poetry in France, said Anatole France when he was discussing the verse of Sainte-Beuve; but we love it in our own fashion; we insist that it shall be eloquent, and we willingly excuse it from being poetic. Old Ironsides, fiery as its lines ring out, is eloquent rather than truly poetic. Here again Holmes declares himself as a survival from the eighteenth century, when English literature conformed to French principles. His favourite reading as a child was Pope's Homer, the couplets of which stimulated his imagination in spite of their formal symmetry. And even their
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