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l's command consisted of his own regiment of two battalions, and Col. Salomon's detached regiment, with several pieces of artillery under commof Major Backof. Col. Siegel's regiment had six hundred men, and Col. Salomon's five hundred. The State troops were commanded by Generals Paroerner. Fifth regiment of Missouri Union Volunteers. Colonel, C. E. Salomon; Lieutenant-Colonel, C. D. Wolff. (As Colonel Salomon was Colonel Salomon was in command at Springfield at last advices, doubtless the battalion was under the charge of Lieutenant-Colonel Wolff, who has since been reporce. Our command was about 1,200 strong, including a part of Colonel Salomon's regiment. We met the enemy in camp, in an open prairie, thrt-Colonel Hassendeubel; seven companies of the Fifth Regiment, Colonel Salomon, and two batteries of artillery, consisting of eight field-pies column, protected in the front by Major Backof's artillery and Col. Salomon's battalion, and in the rear by Col. Siegel's eight companies.
r of our troops I formed in the following manner: On the left the second battalion of the Third Regiment, under command of Major Bischoff, in solid column with four cannon. In the centre the Fifth Regiment in two separate battalions, under Col. Salomon and Lieut.-Col. Wolff. On the right, three cannon under command of Capt. Essig, supported by the first battalion Third Regiment, under Lieut.-Col. Hassendeubel. Having made these dispositions, and advanced a few hundred paces, I commanded by a little creek, called Buck Branch, over which we had to pass. In order to meet them, I abandoned my position at Dry Fork, and ordered two pieces to the right, and two to the left of our reserve and baggage, supported by the detachments of Col. Salomon and Lt.-Col. Wolff, in solid column. Lt.-Col.Wolff, seconding my movement with his accustomed ability, formed three companies of the first battalion, Third Regiment, into line, and made them take up marching line against the cavalry in front
and Fifth regiments, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Albert and Col. Salomon, and six pieces of artillery, under Lieuts. Schaeffer and Schuets men were coming up the road. Lieut. Albert, of the Third, and Col. Salomon, of the Fifth, notified their regiments not to fire on troops coegel, with six pieces of cannon, his own regiment, and that of Colonel Salomon's, moved in a southerly direction, marching about fifteen mileng it to be the Iowa First. His men scattered considerably, and Col. Salomon's could not be rallied. Consequently Siegel lost five of his gu At 8 o'clock in the evening, Gen. Siegel, with his own and Colonel Salomon's command, and six pieces of artillery, moved southward, marchcause of Siegel's repulse was owing very much to the behavior of Col. Salomon's men, who were three months men whose time had expired, and whoing as servants. On the return to Springfield we fell in with Col. Salomon, who said his men had acted badly, and that he could form no ide
long and well. General Siegel, with six pieces of cannon, his own regiment, and that of Colonel Salomon's, moved in a southerly direction, marching about fifteen miles, passing around the extremen a few paces of him, supposing it to be the Iowa First. His men scattered considerably, and Col. Salomon's could not be rallied. Consequently Siegel lost five of his guns, the other being brought awo, without loss to our side. At 8 o'clock in the evening, Gen. Siegel, with his own and Colonel Salomon's command, and six pieces of artillery, moved southward, marching until nearly 2 o'clock, athe hands of the enemy. The cause of Siegel's repulse was owing very much to the behavior of Col. Salomon's men, who were three months men whose time had expired, and who, at request, had agreed to sk, were armed, but simply acting as servants. On the return to Springfield we fell in with Col. Salomon, who said his men had acted badly, and that he could form no idea of the extent of their loss