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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 5: invasion of Virginia. (search)
defense of Washington. It was his first purpose to make a feint on Beauregard at Manassas, while making a real attack upon Joe Johnston in the Valley of Virginia. With the defeat of Johnston the victorious army could march on Beauregard at Manassas, re-enforced by the troops around the Federal capital. Soldiers of high reputation and great merit were ordered to report to Patterson. Fitz John Porter was his adjutant general, Amos Beckwith commissary of subsistence, Crosman quartermaster, Sampson topographical engineer, Newton engineer; while such men as A. E. Burnside, George H. Thomas, Miles, Abercrombie, Cadwalader, Stone, and Negley commanded troops; and then, the laws being silent in the midst of arms, Senator John Sherman, of Ohio, was his aid-de-camp. From Patterson's position two routes led to the Valley of Virginia, one via Frederick, Md., across the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, the other by Hagerstown, Md., crossing at Williamsport and thence to Martinsburg. Patterson wis
nd trade between Worcester County, Maryland, and Virginia. Large supplies of army stores have been transported to the rebels' lines by this route. The necessary measures have been taken to stop the traffic.--A regiment has just passed down Pennsylvania avenue, headed by a soldier who lost a leg at the battle of Stone Bridge. He carried his musket strapped to his back. The spectacle excited the greatest enthusiasm among our citizens. The new gunboat Sagamore was launched to-day from Sampson's yard, East Boston, Mass. Her keel was laid sixty days ago.--N. Y. Herald, Sept. 19. Yesterday a skirmish took place between the Home Guard and some of Gen. Zollicoffer's men at Barboursville, Ky., without resulting in any damage. It was resumed to-day, when seven rebels and one of their horses were killed. One of the Home Guards received six wounds, and another was taken prisoner. The Home Guards numbered thirty-seven, and the rebels three hundred.--Two miles of the Covington and
oo late for me to do any thing but order the little vessel to be set on fire, which was accordingly done, the few men on board having been safely removed. After this we met with no further incident, except one more artillery fight on the way down the river, making five in all. I am happy to say that in all these engagements the artillerists, both white and black, did themselves much credit, as indeed did all my command. I must especially mention companies K (Captain Whitney) and G (Lieutenant Sampson) upon whom very exposed duty devolved, in the way of skirmishing. We brought away about two hundred contra. bands, six bales of cotton of the best quality, and two prisoners, F. Hall (Sixth cavalry) and G. Henry Barnwell, of the Rebel Troop, one of the well-known family of that name. Both were captured by my skirmishers, with their horses and full equipments. For want of transportation, we left behind a number of fine horses. We destroyed large quantities of rice, by burning the
ports of ships destined for the use of belligerents; and your memorialists would further suggest to your Lordship the importance of endeavoring to secure the assent of the Government of the United States of America, and of other foreign countries, to the adoption of similar regulations in those countries also. All which your memorialists respectfully submit. Signed, Thomas Chilton, Jones, Palmer & Co., Farnworth & Jardine, Thos. & Jas. Harrison, L. H. Macintyre, Potter brothers, Chas. Geo. Cowre & Co., M. J. Sealby, R. Gervin & Co., J. Aikin, Finlay, Campbell & Co., Cropper, Ferguson & Co., J. Campbell, S. R. Graves, Rankin, Gilmore & Co., Rathbone Bros. & Co., James Brown & Co., Liverpool, June 9, 1863. James Poole & Co., W. T. Jacob, Henry Moore & Co., Imrie & Tomlinson, Sampson & Holt, James Barnes, Richard Nicholson & son, W. B. Boadle, J. Prowse & Co., Currie, Newton & Co., Nelson, Alexander & Co., Kendall brothers, C. T. Bowrin & Co., G. H. Fletcher & Co., Alfred Holt.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 16: Secession of Virginia and North Carolina declared.--seizure of Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard.--the first troops in Washington for its defense. (search)
this end; and on the day before his appointment, he was instrumental in procuring from the Bank of Redemption, in Boston, a temporary loan to the Commonwealth, for the use of the troops, of the sum of fifty thousand dollars. It was determined that the Sixth Regiment, Colonel Jones, which was a part of Butler's old brigade, should go forward at once to Washington, by way of New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore. It consisted of eleven companies. To these were added the companies of Captains Sampson and Dike, making a corps of thirteen full companies. They were addressed by Governor Andrew and General Butler, in the presence of a vast multitude of citizens, and, in the afternoon, April 17, 1861. departed for Washington by railway. At about the same time, Colonel Wardrop and his regiment embarked on a steamer for Fortress Monroe, in Virginia, then defended by only two companies of artillery, and in imminent peril of seizure by the insurgents of Benjamin F. Butler. that State.
in which they ar leading Enmey in on us at the time Wee Need them they fley to south to Reffuge and leav us to stand Befor the miserable miscreants and herelings of the North to purputrate thear dark deed on A portion of our country wee will oppose them with all the means that the god of Batle can place in our power But not to defende those Robes to purpitrate thear dark deeds and us stand the Blunt Now man come in this Company and Control them on less sent By proper Athority from them in A Command if they do the wadgeous of sin is deth And the wadeious of such is death. Sampson Elza. Wadgeous for wages is stupendous, so is the variation, wadeious. The god of Batle can place in our power is very fine. Much depends on his ability to furnish means, it appears. If he should chance to be hard up, it wouldn't be near so well with the dry forkers as if he should have plenty. Sampson is very jealous of his authority, and makes death the penalty of impertinent interference with it.
from a steamer, attracted our attention near the mouth of the Ogeechee. Signal communication was established with General Hazen, who gave us notice that he had invested the Fort, and also that he observed the steamer. General Sherman signalled him from the top of the old Rice-Mill, that it was important to carry the Fort by assault to-day. The steamer had now approached near enough to draw the fire of the Fort, when her signal-flag was described. Captain McClintock, aided by Lieutenant Sampson, Signal Officers, speedily communicated with the vessel, which proved to be a tug, sent by General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren, for the purpose of communicating with us. Just as the signal officer of the stealer inquired if McAllister was ours, we noticed a brisker fire at the Fort, and our flags and men passing the abattis, through tile ditch and over the parapet, and then we saw the men fire upward in the air, and could distinctly hear their cheer of triumph as they took posession
from a steamer, attracted our attention near the mouth of the Ogeechee. Signal communication was established with General Hazen, who gave us notice that he had invested the Fort, and also that he observed the steamer. General Sherman signalled him from the top of the old Rice-Mill, that it was important to carry the Fort by assault to-day. The steamer had now approached near enough to draw the fire of the Fort, when her signal-flag was described. Captain McClintock, aided by Lieutenant Sampson, Signal Officers, speedily communicated with the vessel, which proved to be a tug, sent by General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren, for the purpose of communicating with us. Just as the signal officer of the stealer inquired if McAllister was ours, we noticed a brisker fire at the Fort, and our flags and men passing the abattis, through tile ditch and over the parapet, and then we saw the men fire upward in the air, and could distinctly hear their cheer of triumph as they took posession
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
. The accusations made against me that I employed slaves were, therefore, most disgraceful. History will be compelled to acknowledge that I have some right to claim credit in the acts which have followed, one upon another, so rapidly of late, and which have tended to make slave-raiding impossible, and to reduce slave-trading to sly and secret exchanges of human chattels in isolated districts in the interior. The book In Darkest Africa was published in June by my usual publishers, Messrs. Sampson, Son & Co., and the Messrs. Scribners of New York brought it out in America. It was translated into French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Dutch, and in English it has had a sale of about one hundred and fifty thousand. The month of May was mainly passed by me in stirring up the Chambers of Commerce and the Geographical Societies to unite in pressing upon the British Government the necessity of more vigorous action to prevent East Africa being wholly absorbed by Germany; and, on com
rs and Markers. (continued). No.Name.Date. 134,966BabcockJan. 21, 1873. 135,065BarnumJan. 21, 1873. 135,078CarpenterJan. 21, 1873. 135,919JohnstonFeb. 18, 1873. 137,108StewartMar. 25, 1873. 138,635GoodrichMay 6, 1873. 138, 636GoodrichMay 6, 1873. 139,249KaneMay 27, 1873. 141,095TilestoneJuly 22, 1873. 143,741BabcockOct. 21, 1873. 143,975FaulknerOct. 28, 1873. 146,094PowellDec. 30, 1873. 152,948HenryJuly 14, 1874. 154,052JonesAug. 11, 1874. 157,649StewartDec. 8, 1874. 157,933Sampson et al.Dec. 22, 1874. 158,576DetweilerJan. 12, 1875. (Reissue.)6,316GoodrichMar. 2, 1875. 9. Tuckers and Plaiters. 16,429BishopJan. 20, 1857. 27,029AllenFeb. 7, 1860. 29,856BradySept. 4, 1860. 35,667BlakeJan. 24, 1862. 40,657BollmanNov. 17, 1863. 57,374PreissAug. 21, 1866. 63,463BrownApr. 2, 1867. 64,237MattisonApr. 30, 1867. 69,461McNeillOct. 1, 1867. 79,447ColeJune 30, 1868. 80,243TuckerJuly 21, 1868. 80,653Morehouse et al.Aug. 4, 1868. 80,721GardnerAug. 4, 1868. 83,21
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