Your search returned 90 results in 36 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
, Charles Asten, John Ortega. Maurice Wagg, R. H. King,----Wilkes,----Demming, Bernard Harley, William Smith, Richard Hamilton, Edward J. Houghton, Oliver O'Brien, Frank Lucas, William Garvin, Charles J. Bibber, John Neil, Robert Montgomery, James Roberts, Charles Hawking, Dennis Conlan, James Sullivan, William Hinnegan, Charles Rice, John Cooper, Patrick Mullin, James Saunders, James Horton, James Rountry, John H. Ferrell, John Ditzenbach, Thomas Taylor, Patrick Mullin, Aaron Anderson or Sanderson (colored), Charles H. Smith, Hugh Logan, Lewis A. Horton, George Moore, Luke M. Griswold, John Jones, George Pyne, Thomas Smith, Charles Reed, John S. Lann, George Schutt, John Mack, John H. Nibbe, Othniel Tripp, John Griffiths, Edward Swatton, John Swatson, Phillip Bazaar, George Province, Augustus Williams, Auzella Savage, John Jackson, Robert M. Blair, Anthony Williams, James W. Verney, Asa Bettram, John P. Ericson, Clement Dees, George W. McWilliams, John Angling, William Dunn, Robert
he had 3,000 men, fell back from Lake City that night. Whether he did so or not, the belief that he did probably misled Seymour into his great blunder thereafter. Gillmore had followed his lieutenant down to Jacksonville and out so far as Baldwin; Feb. 9. returning directly to Jacksonville, and thence Feb. 15. to Hilton Head; without a shadow of suspicion that Seymour contemplated, or (without orders) would attempt, a farther advance. In fact, he had telegraphed to Gillmore from Sanderson on the 12th that I last night ordered Col. Henry to fall back to this point. I am destroying all public property here, and shall go back to the south fork of St. Mary's as soon as Henry returns. I hope he will be in this morning. Gillmore at once responded: I want your command at and beyond Baldwin concentrated at Baldwin without delay. Seymour replied, insisting that To leave the south fork of the St. Mary's will make it impossible for us to advance again ; but intim
One Sanderson, of Orleans County, New-York, makes this proposition through the columns of the Rochester Democrat: The undersigned is willing to enter into an agreement to build two steam battering-rams for one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, ($150,000,) and whip any war vessel now afloat without firing a gun or losing a man; then for seventy-five thousand dollars, ($75,000,) he will build four rams, and whip the two first without firing a gun or losing a man on either side; then for fifty thousand dollars, ($50,000,) he will build eight rams, and whip the four without firing a gun or losing a man on either side; then for twenty-five thousand dollars, ($25,000,) he will build a caloric pony, and place on its back a battery, and do more fighting with it than any regiment of infantry that is now in the field, and, by so doing, demonstrate the fact that the day has come when nations can disband their armies and navies, and, comparatively speaking, do all their fighting by c
, (taken by the cavalry on the main road to Kinston,) which were turned over to the provost-marshal upon our arrival at Kinston on Sunday evening. We advanced with the brigade on Monday morning, arriving at the scene of action at Whitehall, about eleven o'clock A. M. on Tuesday morning, and though not participating in the engagement, were within range of the enemy's guns on the right of the artillery which was engaged. At this point, in obedience to orders of Major-General Foster, Lieut. Sanderson, with a detachment of men, was detailed to examine the river below the bridge, to ascertain the practicability of fording it. After a careful examination of the river for nearly a mile, he reported that it was not fordable. Tuesday afternoon, passing up with the main column on the left bank of the Neuse, we bivouacked at night about twelve miles from Goldsboro. On Wednesday we were detached to guard the baggage train, from which duty we were relieved in the afternoon, when the bagga
the next morning, without any alarm having been given. A dash was at last made by about two hundred of the rebel cavalry, but this force was repulsed, and not a man on our side was injured. In the afternoon, a scouting squad of the Carolinians, crossed the river, and brought back one prisoner, a rebel flag, four rifles, a horse and a fat ox, finding a large force of the enemy in the woods, about two miles from the town. Col. Higginson's headquarters are at the residence of the rebel Col. Sanderson, a very elegant and commodious building. He was at first constantly pestered with applications, on the part of the inhabitants, for permission to pass beyond our lines, and in every instance, he informed the applicants that if their choice led them to go among the rebels, in preference to accepting the protection of the United States, they were privileged to leave. He wished to have his enemies in front, where he could fight them. Those who decided upon remaining, must simply take the
has been repeated, only upon a much grander scale. There must have been some understanding among the incendiaries with regard to the conflagration. At eight o'clock the flames burst from several buildings in different parts of the city, and at a later hour still more were fired. The wind then rose to a stiff gale, and the torch of the incendiary became unnecessary to increase the fire. The only mansions of any value left standing as we move down the river, are the elegant mansions of Col. Sanderson and Judge Burritt, both rebels of the deepest dye. Why so much property, known to belong to Union men, should have been destroyed, and the mansions of these notorious rebels left standing, it is hard to understand. It gives me pleasure to report that the negro troops took no part whatever in the perpetration of this vandalism. They had nothing whatever to do with it, and were simply silent spectators of the splendid but sad spectacle. The Sixth Connecticut charged it upon the Eighth
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Ocean Pond, Florida. (search)
to the enemy. On the 9th instant I removed all the government stores from Sanderson, except fifteen hundred bushels corn, which was burned under my orders. On the 10th the enemy reached Sanderson; on the 11th instant they were within three miles of Lake City. Here I had hastily collected, principally from the District of Me enemy. The enemy retreated that night, hastily and in some confusion, to Sanderson, leaving a large number of their killed and wounded in our possession on the repaired the railroad so as to secure my supplies, I advanced the command to Sanderson, pushing the cavalry rapidly in the direction of the enemy, and from SandersoSanderson to Barber's, and thence to Baldwin, and to this place, twelve miles from Jacksonville, where my further progress was arrested by orders from Brigadier-General Gardthe 20th, it being reported that the enemy were advancing in the direction of Sanderson, I received orders from the Brigadier-General commanding to advance and meet
federate troops engaged. At Jacksonville, Florida, on the 7th of February, the enemy landed a considerable force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery, which was increased by further arrivals on the 8th. General Finegan, with his well-known energy, immediately issued all necessary orders for the concentration of his scattered troops, and lost no time in notifying General Beauregard of the emergency. From Jacksonville the enemy, unhindered, pressed on to Baldwin; then to Barber's; then to Sanderson, and was, on the 11th, within three miles of Lake City. There his progress was checked by a force composed of about 450 infantry, 100 cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. He fell back to Sanderson, and thence to Barber's, on the east bank of the St. Mary's, where he evidently intended to concentrate before moving on Lake City. In the mean time General Finegan, with all the reinforcements he had thus far been able to procure, had marched to Ocean Pond, on the Olustee River, and, on th
considerable loss to the enemy. On the 9th instant I removed all the Government stores from Sanderson, except fifteen hundred bushels corn, which was burned under my orders. On the 10th the enemy reached Sanderson; on the 11th instant they were within three miles of Lake City. Here I had hastily collected, principally from the District of Middle Florida, a small force of 450 infantry, 110 ance, followed the enemy. The enemy retreated that night, hastily and in some confusion, to Sanderson, leaving a large number of their killed and wounded in our possession on the field. Their los instant, having repaired the railroad, so as to secure my supplies, I advanced the command to Sanderson, pushing the cavalry rapidly in the direction of the enemy, and from Sanderson to Barber's, anSanderson to Barber's, and thence to Baldwin and to this place, twelve miles from Jacksonville, where my farther progress was arrested by orders from Brigadier-General Gardner, who had been directed to assume command, by who
els of charcoal, making a ton of refined from 22 cwt. of pig metal. The fluid iron from the blast-furnace is sometimes transferred direct to the refinery, thus saving the time and fuel required for remelting the pig-metal. Various fluxes have been patented or proposed for assisting the process. Hampton, 1856, slakes quicklime with a solution of alkali or alkaline salt. Du Motay and Fontaine use scoriae from the pudding-furnace, oxides of iron and alkaline silicates or carbonates; Sanderson, 1855, uses substances containing oxygen or other element, by which silicium, aluminium, etc., are removed. Blackwell proposed remelting in a cupola furnace alone, or with the addition of substances containing nearly pure iron oxides. Nasmyth and others have employed steam passed through or caused to impinge upon the molten metal in a state of ebullition. Bessemer, in 1855, patented a process of this kind. Martin's refining-furnace. In Martin's furnace (French), pig-iron is f
1 2 3 4