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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Sangster or search for Sangster in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

gton,, July 29, 1861. Capt. E. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: On the 18th of July, at about 9 A. M., I joined the commanding general about two miles beyond Fairfax Court House, on the road to Centreville. He was then about going to Sangster's, and invited me to attend him. Not understanding his journey to have the character of a reconnoissance, but as simply to communicate with the division of Col. Heintzelman, I preferred accompanying the division of Gen. Tyler at Centreville. ition at Blackburn's Ford. It should be borne in mind that the plan of the campaign had been to turn the position of Manassas by the left — that is to say, that from Fairfax Court House and Centreville we were to make a flank movement towards Sangster's and Fairfax station, and thence to Wolf Run Shoals, or in that direction. In my interview with the commanding general, just referred to, he said nothing to indicate any change of plan, but on the contrary, his remarks carried the impression t
er's Station. The four men wounded yesterday belonged to Colonel Miles' division, who had some slight skirmishing in reaching the position. Each column encountered about the same obstructions — trees felled across the road — but the axemen cleared them out in a few moments. There were extensive breastworks thrown up at this place, and some of them with embrasures resettled with sandbags. Extensive breastworks were also thrown up at the Fairfax railroad station, and the road leading to Sangster's. A great deal of work had been done by them, and the number and size of their camps show they have been here in great force. Their retreat, therefore, must have a damaging effect upon them. They left in such haste that they did not draw in their pickets, who came into one of our camps, thinking, as it occupied the same place, that it was their own. The obstructions to the railroad in the vicinity of the station, including the deep cut filled in with earth, etc., can be cleared out in a
hat the victory was overwhelming: near Middleburg, July 19, 1861. I left Manassas Junction last night at sundown. Our troops had very severe fighting on Bull Run, about three miles distant from the Junction, nearly all day yesterday. The artillery was in full play from nine A. M. until between four and five P. M., with two or three intervals of about one hour each. The enemy's loss is thought to be very heavy. Ours is comparatively light. Marye, of the Alexandria Riflemen, and Sangster, of the same company, are killed. A good many of same regiment are wounded, among them Capt. Dulany, severely. I could not learn that any of the Guard were killed or wounded, though I did all in my power to ascertain. The regiment to which they are attached covered itself with glory; but were unfortunately fired into by a Mississippi regiment by mistake. The enemy were repulsed three different times with heavy loss. To use the expression of one of their men taken prisoner, they were sl