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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for John O. Sargent or search for John O. Sargent in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
riches. Joseph R. Ingersoll wrote, April 22:β€” It has given me great delight to learn, as I have learned from various sources, how distinguished has been your reception and how agreeable your career abroad. As long as gentlemen like yourself and Mr. Webster are the representatives of the country, we are perfectly safe in the belief that we shall gain largely in reputation, and in the hope that we may at length persuade the most reluctant out of their prejudices against us. John O. Sargent wrote, May 8:β€” Your visit has almost tempted me to envy you, for it has been flattering to a degree beyond any thing you had reason to expect,β€”the most flattering probably enjoyed by any American since time began. Professor Greenleaf wrote, Sept. 7, 1838:β€” It is a long time since I received a line from you; but the Judge kindly hands me all yours to him, and once in a while I see one of Hillard's; so that I am kept acquainted with most of what befalls you, and am enabled
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
friends, and have received the most affectionate good wishes. Lady Carlisle and my dear, noble friend, Ingham, shed tears in parting with me. We shall meet soon. The wind is fair; and we now wait only for Willis's appearance. Cogswell is by my side at this moment. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. The Wellington arrived at New York, Sunday, May 3. Sumner, on landing, met his brother Albert, then living in the city. That day or the next he dined with his classmate, John O. Sargent, who remembers that he was full of his trip, and conversed very pleasantly about it. His appearance had been very materially improved under the hands of a London tailor. He had lost, too, some of the leanness and lankness of face and figure which he carried through his school and college days, and was beginning to fill out, and to assume more of the portly air of his later days. On his arrival in Boston, Hillard happened to meet him as he was walking from the railway station, wearin
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
mbridge, and knew of Sumner by his reputation, which was very high there. I did not know him personally, however, till I became an inmate of No. 4. This building, at the corner of Court and Washington Streets, became quite famous from the number and ability of some of the men who occupied the rooms for many years. Among them were Rufus Choate, Theophilus Parsons, Horace Mann, George S. Hillard, Francis B. Crowninshield, Luther S. Cushing, John A. Andrew, Joel Giles, Edward G. Loring, John O. Sargent, Theophilus P. Chandler, and William G. Stearns. There was a great deal of law business done in the building; there was great familiarity among the different lawyers: cases that were under investigation and legal points that came up were freely discussed. Sumner was very popular in all the offices; he was fresh from his studies in Cambridge, full of enthusiasm, conversant with all the various editions of legal treatises, new and old; full of curious information, too, in regard to dist