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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley) 28 2 Browse Search
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Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Saulsbury's Sentiments. (search)
Saulsbury's Sentiments. Mr. Scandal in the play declares that Astrology is a most valuable scithe causes of things. We suspect that Mr. Senator Saulsbury must devote his leisure hours to occullled. It is indeed curious. This Union Senator Saulsbury, who is n't a Rebel, who has n't been swused to acquiesce. The truth is, that Mr. Senator Saulsbury does not see, in his volunteer defensethese causes, and why the Rebellion at all? Saulsbury says it was because of the assertion of the right to abolish Slavery. Saulsbury may say so, but the Seceders don't say so, and never have saidevidences in Courts of Justice, nor should Mr. Saulsbury offer them as such in the Senate of the Unsuppose that we understand the reason of Senator Saulsbury's diatribe. Now that it is necessary tolessness of conciliation. The Proclamation, Saulsbury tells us, is brutum fulmen --it is nothing, t and absurdly impotent — and yet — for here Saulsbury hoists himself over the other horn of his di[2 more...]<
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), Union for the Union. (search)
re, and be ready to surrender the Union which they had pretended to reverence? Brooks & Co. are like Garrison, without Garrison's virtues and good conscience. We thought the Senate chamber purged of plantation insolence, and the well-weaponed Saulsbury starts up to convince us of our mistake — Saulsbury the Disunionist. We can imagine some rebellions Abraham — the Patriarch of Slavery, as Voltaire was the Patriarch of Infidelity — we see him reading his Northern newspaper, and grinning gloSaulsbury the Disunionist. We can imagine some rebellions Abraham — the Patriarch of Slavery, as Voltaire was the Patriarch of Infidelity — we see him reading his Northern newspaper, and grinning gloriously over his grog, as he peruses the Pro-Slavery journal! Nobody will mark more keenly than the Confederate observer, the opposition to the Administration which has been gathered by the concretion of all the dusty particles of a commercial self-interest. Why should n't he be chippery? He has newspapers printed for him without cost to his own flaccid purse — he has Union Governors plotting pretty things for his advantage — he has Northern clergymen tearing out the heart of both Tes
itionist329 Rogersville, the Great Flogging in16 Roundheads and Cavaliers151 Russell, William H158, 187 Repudiation of Northern Debts162 Red Bill, a New Orleans Patriarch318 Romilly, Sir Samuel828 Robertson, Dr., on Slavery803 Screws, Benjamin, Negro Broker8, 88 Society for Promoting National Unity186 Stevens, Alexander H148 Secession, The Ordinance of178 Slidell, Miss204 Secessionists, The Dissensions of219 St. Domingo, The Argument from326 Saulsbury, Senator334, 351 Tyler, John, his Diagnosis128 Times, The London158, 177, 309, 366, 374 Toombs, General, his Trials269 Thirty-Five, The Council of273 Taliaferro, Mr., his Defalcation316 Thugs in New Orleans318 University, a Southern Wanted61 Utopia, A. Slaveholding300 Van Buren, John44 Virginia, Democracy in185 Wise, Henry A.2, 95, 135, 155 Walker, William, his Letter to General Cass33, 35 Winslow, Hubbard136 Williams, Commander206 Winthrop, Robert C