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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 26 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 19 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Sergeant Oats, Prison Life in Dixie: giving a short history of the inhuman and barbarous treatment of our soldiers by rebel authorities. You can also browse the collection for Saulsbury or search for Saulsbury in all documents.

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he prisons in Virginia and Carolina first, and would probably reach Andersonville in two weeks, or ten days. This news threw the camp into a wild excitement, though I must confess that many of us did not believe it. We had been deceived too often, and this sounded so good that we suspected it was being done to make us docile while they were moving us somewhere else. But in a few days they gave us copies of papers that contained accounts of the release of prisoners from Richmond and Saulsbury. Then we began to believe and to grow feverish with excitement. In due time rebel officers came in and began to enroll names, putting down rank and regiment. The first call was to take out all the sick: but they gave us the wink, and told us that if any one had any greenbacks, or gold, they would enroll him as sick, and take him out on the first train. John C--, Cudge S-and I were partners in the sack-tent, and had been bunk-mates during the whole of our prison life, except when