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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 26 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 19 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 11 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1863., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Saulsbury or search for Saulsbury in all documents.

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Lincoln's Usurpations.speech of Mr. Saulsbury,of Delaware, in the United States Senate, Jan. 8th, 1863. [From the New York Caucasian.] Mr. Saulsbury.--Mr. President, when the injustice and intolerance of the British ministry were forcing an issue between the parent country and the colonies in reference to the power of Parliament to impose taxes upon the latter without their consent, the remonstrances of the ablest English statesmen were treated by the advocates of power as the utterances Mr. Saulsbury.--Mr. President, when the injustice and intolerance of the British ministry were forcing an issue between the parent country and the colonies in reference to the power of Parliament to impose taxes upon the latter without their consent, the remonstrances of the ablest English statesmen were treated by the advocates of power as the utterances of sedition. It was then that the noble Chatham thus spoke: "Sorry I am to hear the liberty of speech in this House imputed as a crime. But the imputation shall not discourage me. It in a liberty I mean to exercise. No gentleman ought to be afraid to exercise it. It is a liberty by which the gentleman who calumniates it might have profited." It has been frequently said upon this floor since the commencement of this unnatural war, that we are making history. Sir, we are but repeati