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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Williamsburg and the charge of the Twenty-fourth Virginia of Early's brigade. (search)
nearest Confederate line, he takes his own brigade and part of Naglee's--five regiments — and ten guns, in all probably over 4,000 men, and learning that one of the redoubts on the extreme left of the Confederate line was unoccupied, he crosses Saunders' pond and marches into it, and then, in the language of the Comte de Paris, seeing no enemy, he fearlessly proceeded to march into the next. But on approaching it, he perceives Bratton, with part of his Sixth South Carolina, preparing to opposer the purpose, for they outnumbered the foe, and were quite sufficient to have captured General Hancock and his five regiments and ten guns, one and all, who were far in advance of General Sumner, and who could only retreat by a narrow road over Saunders' pond. From all this want of generalship, skill and care, arose great confusion and greater misfortune. Not knowing exactly the location of the point of attack, it was scarcely possible that the line of battle would be properly arranged with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
peer was wounded in one of the night attacks, and Colonels Avery and Haywood, Lieutenant-Colonels George and Ashcraft, and Major Davidson in the charge Sunday morning. After the loss of so many field officers, Major Barry and Captains Harris, Saunders, Brown and Nicholson, rendered me grent assistance. Captain Saunders, in his official report, calls special attention to the efficiency of Lieutenants E. Price and J. L. Farrow of the Thirty-third regiment. Lieutenant Bryan, ordnance officerCaptain Saunders, in his official report, calls special attention to the efficiency of Lieutenants E. Price and J. L. Farrow of the Thirty-third regiment. Lieutenant Bryan, ordnance officer, and Lieutenant Nicholson, brigade inspector, discharged their duties well, though the latter had but few stragglers and no skulkers to drive forward that I have yet heard of. I am specially indebted to my Aid-de-camp, Lieutenant O. Lane, and to one of my couriers, George E. Barringer, for the great assistance rendered me. They both bore themselves well under the hottest fires. My other courier was a paltroon, and has been sent back to his regiment. The brigade loss is twelve (12) commissio