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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for James E. Saunders or search for James E. Saunders in all documents.

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ted, and we should guard our censure of the general who leads his whole force to attack, even when he fails. The men had been standing all day in the trenches exposed to a constant and pelting rain, and, having been suddenly called to arms and hourly expecting an attack, had had neither time nor opportunity to prepare food. They were now hurriedly put in motion. At midnight, on the 18th of January, the Confederate army marched against the enemy in this order: First, with Bledsoe's and Saunders's independent cavalry companies a-a vanguard, Zollicoffer's brigade ; thus Walthall's Fifteenth Mississippi Regiment in advance, followed by Rutledge's battery, and Cummings's Nineteenth, Battle's Twentieth, and Stanton's Twenty-fifth Tennessee Regiments. Then came Carroll's brigade, as follows: Newman's Seventeenth, Murray's Twenty-eighth, and Powell's Twenty-ninth Tennessee Regiments, with two guns under Captain McClung, and Wood's Sixteenth Alabama Regiment in reserve. Branner's and Mc
d Buell's views. Federal demonstrations. Grant, Smith, and Foote. Federal advance. River-defenses. letter of Hon. James E. Saunders. General Johnston's appeal for reinforcements. directions for defense. Floyd detached. General Johnston's strof January Colonel Munford, aide to General Johnston, received the following letter, written the day before, by the Hon. James E. Saunders: Nashville, January , 17, 1862. dear sir: I am just starting for Fort Heiman, opposite Fort Henry, where I and Henry, six miles from each, where there is a village of houses to shelter the men. Hurriedly, your friend, James E. Saunders. P. S.-The Alabama volunteers will have finished their 100 cabins by the time I get back. Taking care of the mt Henry. Do not lose a moment. Work all night. General Johnston certainly had some right to feel disappointed at Mr. Saunders's account of the condition of things at Fort Henry. Tilghman had written him, December 28th, before the arrival of th