Your search returned 26 results in 9 document sections:

present condition of our affairs in highest concernments call for a diligent and speedy use of the best means seriously to discuss and rightly to understand our liberty and duty, thereby to beget unity amongst ourselves in the due observance of obedience and fidelity unto the authority of England and our own just privileges, for the effecting whereof it is ordered by this Court, that Mr. Symon Bradstreet, Mr. Samuell Symonds, Major General Denison, Mr. Danforth, Major Win. Hauthorne, Capt. Tho. Savage, Capt. Edward Johnson, Capt. Eliazer Lusher, Mr. Mather, Mr. Norton, Mr. Cobbet, and Mr. Michell, be and hereby are appointed a committee, immediately after the dissolution or adjournment of the Court, to meet together in Boston on second day next, at twelve of the clock, to consider and debate such matter or thing of public concernment touching our patent, laws, privileges, and duty to his Majesty, as they in their wisdom shall judge most expedient, and draw up the result of their app
Mr. Chauncy was at variance. Deane's Hist. Scituate. p. 219. Baster, Joseph, by w. Mary, had Mary, b. 13 May 1643. Savage says he removed to Boston in 1647, and had other children. Batherick, or Baverick, Thomas, m. Ruth, dau. of Roger Buckwas one of the Committee of Public Safety, 20 Ap. 1689, in which year he was associated with Col. John Pynchon and Major Thomas Savage, in negotiating a treaty of peace with the Maquas, or Mohawks; a Commissioner of Imposts, 25 Dec. 1691; Commissaryand, six acres, bordering on said street and on Charles River. Mr. Benjamin's house burnt, and £ 100 in goods lost, 1636. Savage's Winthrop, i. 185. He removed to Wat. and d. 14 June 1645. His eldest son was John. 2. Joseph, of Barnstable, sold 49; preached at Guilford, New Haven, Branford, Derby, and Rye, in Connecticut; and d. about 1697. Quart. Reg., May 1836. Savage (Gen. Dict.) says he died 14 June 1687; and that his son John was minister at Rye, and died at Derby 23 Sept. 1708. Je
Mr. Chauncy was at variance. Deane's Hist. Scituate. p. 219. Baster, Joseph, by w. Mary, had Mary, b. 13 May 1643. Savage says he removed to Boston in 1647, and had other children. Batherick, or Baverick, Thomas, m. Ruth, dau. of Roger Buckwas one of the Committee of Public Safety, 20 Ap. 1689, in which year he was associated with Col. John Pynchon and Major Thomas Savage, in negotiating a treaty of peace with the Maquas, or Mohawks; a Commissioner of Imposts, 25 Dec. 1691; Commissaryand, six acres, bordering on said street and on Charles River. Mr. Benjamin's house burnt, and £ 100 in goods lost, 1636. Savage's Winthrop, i. 185. He removed to Wat. and d. 14 June 1645. His eldest son was John. 2. Joseph, of Barnstable, sold 49; preached at Guilford, New Haven, Branford, Derby, and Rye, in Connecticut; and d. about 1697. Quart. Reg., May 1836. Savage (Gen. Dict.) says he died 14 June 1687; and that his son John was minister at Rye, and died at Derby 23 Sept. 1708. Je
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1854. (search)
the pitcher shaped. James Savage. Captain 2d Mass. Vols. (Infantry), May 24, 1861; Major, June 23, 1862; Lieutenant-Colonel, September 17, 1862; died at Charlottesville, Va., October 22, 1862, of wounds received at Cedar Mountain, August 9. James Savage, Jr., the subject of this memoir, was the only son of the Hon. James Savage of Boston, well known for his historical researches connected with the early settlers of New England, and of Elizabeth Otis (Stillman) Savage. Major Thomas Savage, the founder of the family in America, came to this country in 1635, settled in Boston, and rendered valuable service to the Colony as commander of the Massachusetts forces in King Philip's war. His son inherited the martial instincts of the father, and was the noble, heroic youth spoken of by the old chronicler of that war, who holding the rank of Ensign in Captain Moseley's company, was twice wounded. These words might be aptly quoted to describe James Savage, Jr. Born in Boston
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, I. List of officers from Massachusetts in United States Navy, 1861 to 1865. (search)
Hope; Quaker City; Fearnot.North Atlantic.June 10, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. Master's Mate. Sanborn, Thomas T.,Me.Mass,Mass.Dec. 19, 1863.Actg. 3d Asst. Engr.Niphon; Wando.North Atlantic; South Atlantic.Oct. 11, 1865.Hon. discharged.Actg. 3d Asst. Engr. Sanford, William C. N.,-Mass.Mass.July 30, 1864.Actg. Master's Mate.Wando.South Atlantic.June 30, 1865.Resigned.Mate. Sargent, Howard,-Mass.Mass.Dec. 22, 1862.Actg. Master's Mate.Clifton.West Gulf.May 15, 1865.Hon. discharged.Mate. Savage, Thomas,Mass.Mass.-Apr. 20, 1865.Actg. Master's Mate.Gertrude.West Gulf.Mar. 12, 1868.Mustered out.Actg. Master's Mate. Savory, George E.,Mass.Mass.Mass.Nov. 13, 1863.Actg. 3d Asst. Engr.Sacramento; Canandaigua; Frolic.Special Service; South Atlantic; European.July 8, 1869.Hon. discharged.Actg. 3d Asst. Engr. Sawtelle, Isaiah L.,Mass.Mass.Mass.Sept. 2, 1863.Actg. 3d Asst. Engr.Britannia.North Atlantic.May 6, 1864.Deceased.Actg. 3d Asst. Engr. Sawyer, B. A.,N. H.Mass.Mass.Feb. 9, 1865.Actg
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, Index of names of persons. (search)
argent, Epes, 710 Sargent, G. W., 388 Sargent, H. B., 193, 227, 443, 554, 710 Sargent, Howard, 128 Sargent, J. W., 346 Sargent, John, 584 Sargent, L. D., 227 Sargent, L. M., Jr., 227, 388, 711 Sargent, W. S., 346 Saul, Thomas, 346 Saunders, Caleb, 346 Saunders, Charles, 346 Saunders, Daniel, 584 Saunders, Gilman, 346 Saunders, John, 346 Saunders, R. A., 346 Saunderson, C. B., 346 Saunderson, E. Z., 347 Savage, Cyrus, 347 Savage, James, Jr., 227 Savage, S. G., 347 Savage, Thomas, 128 Saville, H. M., 389 Saville, J. F., 389 Savory, G. E., 128 Sawin, J. P., 347 Sawin, N. D., 584 Sawin, R. L., 347 Sawin, W. J., 479 Sawtell, E. D., 347 Sawtell, J. A., 227 Sawtelle, Andrew, 584 Sawtelle, I. L., 128 Sawyer, A. D., 347 Sawyer, B. A., 128 Sawyer, Charles, 128 Sawyer, Christopher, 347 Sawyer, E., 575 Sawyer, F. A., 389 Sawyer, J. S., 347 Sawyer, N. C., 443, 554 Sawyer, N. D. A., 347, 443 Sawyer, W. C., 347 Sawyer, W. H., 347 Saxton, M. W., 443, 49
by British troops, Mar. 17, 1776 Taken possession of by Washington's Army, Mar. 17, 1776 Great riot anticipated, 100 extra watchmen appointed, Aug. 15, 1812 Full of troops, English attack expected, Sep. 10, 1814 Inaugurated as a City, May 1, 1822 Advocate, John Phillips, chosen, Mar. 8, 1802 Peter Thatcher, chosen, Mar. 9, 1807 Bull, was kept by Robert Alkok, 1652 Clerk, John Oliver, chosen, July 20, 1641 Anthony Stoddard, chosen, Mar. 18, 1650 Town Clerk, Thomas Savage, chosen, Mar. 16, 1652 Thomas Marshall, chosen, Mar. 27, 1654 William Davis, chosen, Mar. 30, 1655 Hezekiah Usher, chosen, Mar. 14, 1663 John Joyleff, chosen, Mar. 26, 1667 Edward Willis, chosen, Mar. 30, 1684 Joseph Bridgman, chosen, Mar. 14, 1691 Ephraim Savage, chosen, Mar. 12, 1692 William Griggs, chosen, Mar. 8, 1696 Joseph Prout, chosen, Mar. 1, 1701 Samuel Gerrish, chosen, Mar. 11, 1733 Had no room to keep records, Oct. 10, 1734 Ezekiel Goldt
he Niagara or the Consul General and his corps, which was a gratuitous assumption of police and administrative jurisdiction.-- Capt. Laurent hoisted the flag upon the Brig A. A. Chanman as a private signal the other day, is consequence of which Mr. Savage, the Spanish-American Vine Consul, sent the register of the vessel in Washington, making himself a regular Lincoln judge, jury and executioner — assuming the responsibility.--Ordering the captain before him, he says: "Sir. you will henceforth you will henceforth not ceins to this consulate for favor or protection. I have sent your register to Washington and put your vessel in the hands of the Spanish authorities." Response--"I ask no favors — I have had no protection. My vessel is, at any rate, I am happy to learn, in the charge of gentlemen, and men who are honest." "No impudence, sir; I speak to you officially."--"That is rich! as if anybody could be impudent to you. Good morning, Thomas Savage, Esquire." And so they parted
of New Orleans, a Mr. Brodderdorf, who arrived here in the British schooner J. H. Toone, Pennington, master, on the 9th inst., as reported to you the 10th and she has been loaded by him in the past week with a few cases of arms, powder, lead, naval stores, block tin, &c., cleared for Matamoras, Mexico, on the 19th, and sailed for her destination yesterday at 10 A. M. The vessel was purchased cheap, as a venture, at $1,000. For what ports her cargo is intended, there can be no question. Thomas Savage, Esq., Vice Consul of the United States, reported personally at the Custom-House that the goods on board — contraband of war — were intended for the disaffected and rebellious ports of the U. States; but there was no legal way under our laws, the flag covering the goods and the bottom, to refuse clearance, and unless she should be taken in the act of attempting to pass the blockading squadron--of which there could be no evidence here — there can be no remedy. Other like cases will be tr<