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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
efly yourself. Your friends here are generally as you would have them. Hillard is crowded with law business, but only the happier for work. His book on Italy is more successful than anything of the sort ever printed among us. Above five thousand copies have been sold. I trust you have read it . . . . . Prescott is well, and has in press the first two volumes of his Philip II. We see him almost daily, and he is as fresh as ever, with twenty good years of work in him, at fifty-nine. Savage, blessed old man, is busy with his unending antiquarian researches, and makes his last days happy—though an excellent wife and two daughters have been taken from him—by bringing to his home a daughter, made to carry sunshine anywhere, and a son-in-law of much intellectual cultivation and very agreeable qualities. We are worried about your war, and are probably more anxious to see an end of it than if we were Englishmen. At least, such is the case with those of us who are most interested
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
even months ago. But he does not yet feel himself equal to severe work, and has not undertaken any. In this I think he is wise. Mr. Prescott died nine days after this was written. The whole of this subject is reserved for a later chapter. Savage, who is now, I think, seventy-five years old, is uncommonly vivacious and active. He is now getting proof-sheets of the first out of four volumes of his book of vain genealogies . . . . It may be hoped he will live to carry it through the press;Year, and again, only yesterday, with Cogswell, who, after spending three or four days with us, went to New York this morning. The two Annas and Lizzie send love. So do I. So do Prescott and Hillard, to whom I gave your messages, and so does Savage, to whom you sent none. Always yours, Geo. Ticknor. To Sir Walter Calverly Trevelyan. Boston, U. S. A., June 28, 1859. my dear Sir Walter,—. . . . Hillard Then visiting England, and introduced to Sir Walter Trevelyan by Mr. Ticknor.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
his family. which had been promised three successive years; then we went to New York to buy carpets, missing Cogswell, or, as he pretends, avoiding him by a day; then we went to some friends on the North River; and now we are just come back from Savage's, Mr. James Savage's country-place at Lunenburg, in the northern part of Massachusetts. where we have been due since 1855. Of course the few intervening days at home have been busy enough. The practical result, however, of the whole is, thMr. James Savage's country-place at Lunenburg, in the northern part of Massachusetts. where we have been due since 1855. Of course the few intervening days at home have been busy enough. The practical result, however, of the whole is, that we have had an uncommonly pleasant summer,—generally a gay one for old folks,—and that we are now in excellent health, gathered comfortably to our own hearthstone, with good pluck to encounter a New England winter, which the two Annas like less than I do. Touching the Prince's visit,—of which you speak inquiringly,—I think you know just about as much as I do . . . . Everything, however, has, I believe, been done circumspectly, and is likely to turn out as well as can be expected. My whol
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Appendix A. (search)
ent, and, when it seemeth to him good, to return you to us again in safety and in health. This evening the good man, Mr. Savage, is with us. He is good, or he would not have been here. Your note by the pilot is just handed to us by the goodness ogrow wiser and better,—to learn how to be more useful to yourself, your friends, and your country. November 6.—. . . . Savage comes to see us every Sunday evening, as faithful and as constantly as the sun rises and sets. Good and charming as he iuart and I expect too much from you and Everett, you and he should not write such flattering accounts to Dr. Kirkland and Savage, of the advantages which Gottingen possesses over Cambridge and other universities in this country. So long as you and h I know I have long experienced his prudence and good judgment in all his affairs and all his arrangements. She charged Savage to beg you not to regret your last year's absence, but remember it is all right; we ought not to complain,—it is God who <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
Princess of, 382. Sales, Francis, I. 7, 368. Salisbury, First Marquess of, I. 267, 268; Marchioness of, 268. Salviati, 1. 450, 451. Sands, Dr , 1. 425. Sandwich, Cape Cod, visits with Mr. Webster, I. 386. Santa Cruz, Marques de, I. 195, 207, 221, 223; library of, II. 248; son of, 263. Santa Cruz, Marquesade, I. 208. Santarem, Marques de, II. 133. San Teodoro, Duca di, T. 174. Saragossa. See Zaragoza. Sartorius von Waltershausen, 1.121. Sauli, II. 42. Savage, James, T. 2, 9, 85, 252, 273, 316 note, 319 and note, 391, II. 292, 420, 427. Savigny, F. K. von, I. 499. Saxe-Cobourg, Duke of, it. 332. Saxony, Anton King of, I 461, 463. 464, 465, 466, 467, 481: death of, II. 12 note. Saxony, Princess Amelie Duchess of, T 463, 465, 469, 477, it. 54, 55, 88, 89, 201, 202, 481; death of, 489, 490 Saxony, Princess Augusta Duchess of, I. 461 note, 463, 484, 486. Saxony, Prince Frederic Duke of and Regent (also King of), I. 462 note, 463, 468, 48