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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for M. Savage or search for M. Savage in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 2.-fight at Port Royal, S. C. January 1, 1862. (search)
itre the field. They galloped rapidly through an old field, down the causeway, to the spot where the shell had burst among our troops, for the purpose of ascertaining the number of our wounded. This brought them within one hundred yards of the enemy's infantry, who were in Chaplin's house, and within range of their howitzers. They found five or six South-Carolina soldiers helplessly wounded. As they could not be removed on horseback, both officers retired, and securing a wagon, with proper escort, reached and removed these brave men. Before moving off, Dr. Turnipseed had to take up an artery, and during all this time, and until under cover, the enemy kept up a sharp fire of shells at the wagon and guard, fortunately without damage. The enemy disappeared on the night of the 3d. Col. Savage, with a battery of the Sixteenth Tennessee regiment, went down to the causeway, and did not see them. We learn that our men have always held Page's Point, and do so now. --Norfolk Day Book.
third. On Tuesday morning, March fourth, at half-past 9 A. M., the transports weighed anchor and followed the Mohican, and arrived at the bar off Fernandina at eleven o'clock. At half-past 12 o'clock P. M., Gen. Wright and staff were transferred from the Empire City to the Belvidere, and at two o'clock were landed at the wharf. In the mean time the gunboats arrived by the way of Cumberland Sound, and the Ottawa being fired upon from a railroad-train, returned the fire, killing two men, M. Savage and John M. Thompson, both clerks in stores in Fernandina. The Ottawa continued to fire at the train, but the conductor having cut off some of the rear cars and put on extra steam, managed to escape. The steamboat Darlington was not quite so fortunate. The Ottawa pursued her, firing at her eleven-inch shells, but her captain did not surrender until he ran aground, although the boat was crowded with men, women, and children, and although he was appealed to by the women on their bended