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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clemens, Samuel Langhorne 1835- (search)
s; but by 1900 he had paid off all obligations by the proceeds of his books and lectures. He has travelled extensively in Europe, Australia, Samuel Langhorne Clemens. and other places. His books include The jumping frog; The innocents abroad; Roughing it; Adventures of Tom Sawyer; The adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Prince and the pauper; A tramp abroad; Life on the Mississippi; A Yankee at King Arthur's Court; Tom Sawyer abroad; Pudd'nhead Wilson; Joan, of arc; More tramps abroad, etc.s; but by 1900 he had paid off all obligations by the proceeds of his books and lectures. He has travelled extensively in Europe, Australia, Samuel Langhorne Clemens. and other places. His books include The jumping frog; The innocents abroad; Roughing it; Adventures of Tom Sawyer; The adventures of Huckleberry Finn; The Prince and the pauper; A tramp abroad; Life on the Mississippi; A Yankee at King Arthur's Court; Tom Sawyer abroad; Pudd'nhead Wilson; Joan, of arc; More tramps abroad, etc.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
to an end some day, though we may never live to see it. Her benevolent face, her use of catnip tea, her faith in the almanac, her domestic virtue, and her knowledge of the most significant facts in the life of every person in the village immediately made a large circle of readers recognize the lifelike portrayal of a person known in every American community. It is interesting to observe that her nephew Ike and his experience with the dog and cat and with spirits is a striking prototype of Tom Sawyer in his relationship to his Aunt Polly. Three New York writers of broad burlesque in both prose and verse may be mentioned together. There appeared in The New York herald a series of satirical lyrics in the assumed character of an Irish private in the Union Army who rapidly became famous. These were written by Charles Graham Halpine (1829-68), a versatile Irish journalist and poet who had been with General Hunter in South Carolina, and were published subsequently in two volumes as Life
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: books for children (search)
ailey Aldrich See also Book III, Chaps. VI and X. made a notable success artistic as well as popular with his Story of a bad boy. A semi-idealized record of his own New England childhood, its only intention was to record zestfully what had really been the life of a boy engaged in no adventurous actions other than ordinary escapades. It was a departure when published in 1869. A half-dozen years later appeared another masterpiece of pranks regarded at the time as by no means innocent. Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel Huckleberry Finn (1884), by Samuel L. Clemens, See also Book III, Chaps. VIII. raised a tempest in the cambric-teapot world and are even yet looked at askance in some children's libraries. But in spite of moralists they immediately took the foremost place as stories of the American boy, and in a surprisingly short while became world classics. They are not explicitly treated as boy's stories throughout, and in each are description and social observation beyond t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, Theodore, 280 Times (London), 141, 142, 195 Times (N. Y.), 192, 193, 194, 195, 270, 357 n. Times (Troy), 184 Timrod, Henry, 291, 293-295, 296, 300, 301, 303, 304, 307, 308, 309, 311 To an Insect, 239 Toby Tyler, 405 To Helen, 65 To John C. Fremont, 283 Token, the, 19, 172, 173, 369 Token and Atlantic Souvenir, the, 173 Token for the children of New England, a, 396 Told by Uncle Remus, 350 Tom Jones, 396 Tom Owen the Bee-Hunter. See Thorpe, T. B. Tom Sawyer, 405 To My mother, 67 Tournament, the, 304 Town and country mouse, the, 373 Townsend, Mrs., 306 Tracts (Force), 122 Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, 285 Transferred Ghost, the, 386 Translation of the Gospels, 210 Traubel, 263 n., 272 Travels in New England and New York, 201, 201 n., 203, 205 Travels, Voyages and Adventures of Gilbert Go-Ahead, The, 154 Treason's lost device, 283 Trent, W. P., 304 Tribune (N. Y.), 156, 187, 188, 189, 191, 192, 193, 194, 266 n. T
gan with the publication in New York in 1867 of The celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County. A newspaper now sent him to Europe to record what he sees with his own eyes. He did so in Innocents abroad, and his countrymen shouted with laughter. This, then, was Europe after all-another fake until this shrewd river-pilot who signed himself Mark Twain took its soundings! Then came a series of far greater books-Roughing it, Life on the Mississippi, The Gilded age (in collaboration), and Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn --books that make our American Odyssey, rich in the spirit of romance and revealing the magic of the great river as no other pages can ever do again. Gradually Mark Twain became a public character; he retrieved on the lecture platform the loss of a fortune earned by his books; he enjoyed his honorary D. Litt. from Oxford University. Every reader of American periodicals came to recognize the photographs of that thick shock of hair, those heavy eyebrows, the gallant d
of a traveler, Irving 91 Tales of a Wayside Inn, Longfellow 155 Tamerlane and other poems, Poe 89 Taylor, Bayard, 255 Telling the Bees, Whittier 158 Tennessee's partner, Harte 242 Thanatopsis, Bryant 103, 104, 106 Thomas, Edith, 257 Thompson, Denman, 248 Thoreau, H. D., representative of New England thought, 119; life and writings, 130-39; nature-writing, 262; typically American, 265 Ticknor, George, 89, 111, 178, 216 Timrod, Henry, 225 To Helen, Poe 189, 192 Tom Sawyer, Clemens 238 Tour of the prairies, Irving 91 Transcendentalism, 111 et seq., 218; bibliography, 270-71 Tritemius, Whittier 161 True Relation, Smith 8-10, 25-26 True Reportory of the Wrack of Sir Thomas Gates, Kt. Vpon and from the Islands of the Bermudas, Strachey 26 Tuckerman, F. G., quoted, 117 Twain, Mark, see Clemens, S. L. Twicetold tales, Hawthorne 148 Tyler, Professor, 64 Ulalume, Poe 192 Uncle Tom's cabin, Stowe 98, 208, 219, 220-23 Union of the col
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ed Hadleyburg (1899) and The $30,000 Bequest (1904). Tom Sawyer, his second extended effort in fiction and his first masritten; and that was near the truth. In the two sequels Tom Sawyer abroad (1894) and Tom Sawyer, Detective (1896), the plotTom Sawyer, Detective (1896), the plots are rather flimsy contrivances of the humorous fancy, but the stories are partly redeemed by the established reality of thdiom and the first-hand observation for which one values Tom Sawyer. The Prince and the Pauper is a distinguished book in th it; but that is nothing. Huckleberry Finn exceeds even Tom Sawyer almost as clearly as Tom Sawyer exceeds The Prince and tTom Sawyer exceeds The Prince and the Pauper. Mark Twain had conceived the tale in 1876 as a sequel to the story of Tom. In the course of its long gestation h of Mississippi fiction with a desire to express what in Tom Sawyer he had hardly attempted, what, indeed, came slowly into imaginative satire. In the second class go Roughing it, Tom Sawyer, Life on the Mississippi, Huckleberry Finn, Adam's diary
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, 541 n. Todd, Mabel Loomis, 33 Todd, Mary, 371 To have and to hold, 91, 287, 550 Tolstoy, 81, 83, 87, 92, 606 Tome, Philip, 154 To-Morrow, 277 Tom Sawyer, 15, 16, 20 Tom Sawyer abroad, 15 Tom Sawyer, detective, 5 Tony the Bootblack, 287 Tools and the man, 217 Too much Johnson, 285 Torrence, Ridgely, 2Tom Sawyer abroad, 15 Tom Sawyer, detective, 5 Tony the Bootblack, 287 Tools and the man, 217 Too much Johnson, 285 Torrence, Ridgely, 267 Torrey, Bradford, 165 Tourgee, Albion Winegar, 86, 352 Townsend, Edward Waterman, 26 Toymaker of Niiremburg, the, 292 Tracy, Destutt, 429-30 Trades Review, 438 Tragic muse, the, 103 Trail of the Lonesome Pine, 288 Train, George Francis, 145 Traits of American Indian life and character by a Fur trader, 137 TTom Sawyer, detective, 5 Tony the Bootblack, 287 Tools and the man, 217 Too much Johnson, 285 Torrence, Ridgely, 267 Torrey, Bradford, 165 Tourgee, Albion Winegar, 86, 352 Townsend, Edward Waterman, 26 Toymaker of Niiremburg, the, 292 Tracy, Destutt, 429-30 Trades Review, 438 Tragic muse, the, 103 Trail of the Lonesome Pine, 288 Train, George Francis, 145 Traits of American Indian life and character by a Fur trader, 137 Tramp abroad, a, 10 Tramp, tramp, tramp, the boys are marching, 497 Transactions (Am. Antiquarian Society), 445 n. Trans-Atlantic historical solidarity, 198 Transcendentalism in New England, 528 Transcript (Boston), 513 Transit of civilization, the, 19 Transylvania University, 619 Traveller from Altruria, a, 83 T