hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 8 4 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 6 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 2 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 5 5 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Saxe or search for Saxe in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Doc. 117.-General Patterson's movement. Charlestown, Va., Thursday, July 18, 1861. The army, under Gen. Patterson, has been rivalling the celebrated King of the French. With twenty thousand men he marched to Bunker Hill, and then — marched back again. What it all means Heaven only knows. I think it would puzzle the spirits of Caesar, Saxe, Napoleon, Wellington, and all the departed heroes, to make it out. The reason currently assigned is that the enemy had been largely reinforced, and had strongly intrenched himself at Winchester, expecting the attack. The old story. It is said he had over 20,000 men and 22 cannon. I don't believe it, for the simple reason that like all the other reports of the same kind which have invariably turned out to be false, it rests entirely upon public rumor. Our scouts and pickets were never sent sufficiently near to ascertain the truth. But another significant fact about which there is no doubt is, that the enemy had felled trees and pl