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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 70 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 61 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 34 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 26 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 14 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Saxon or search for Saxon in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
: One day, when the wing-dams were about half completed, General Smith asked me to accompany him to General Emory's quarters. They were soon engaged in earnest conversation, and I heard Emory say there was a bad outlook; that General Banks had just informed him that Colonel Bailey thought it would take a week longer to get the fleet over the Falls, and Banks was very uneasy and seriously contemplated abandoning the fleet to its fate and marching away. General Smith replied, with some Anglo-Saxon more forcible than polite, that he wouldn't leave Admiral Porter until that locality, from which we all hope to escape, had frozen over. We went from General Emory's to Admiral Porter's boat, and General Smith told the Admiral what he had just heard, and assured him that orders, or no orders, his command should not leave the fleet until they saw it safe through to the Mississippi River. Admiral Porter replied that he was not surprised to hear such news, as he had been anticipating as much.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
orities in not preventing the said cruisers from getting to sea. There could be no better argument than this against all the specious writings which have appeared from time to time, and it especially refutes the attempt of Commander Semmes to justify his course. Great Britain is a nation from whom nothing like payment could have been exacted, but the concurrence of the English Commissioners was based on that high sense of justice and fair-play which is the ruling characteristic of the Anglo-Saxon race. Commander Sernmes, after spending a few days in Liverpool, collecting his officers and making financial arrangements, departed on the 13th of August, 1862, in the steamer Bahama, to join the 290. Commander James D. Bullock, formerly of the U. S. Navy, accompanied him, to be present at the christening of the 290, which he had contracted for and superintended while she was building. The 290 was a vessel of 900 tons burden, 230 feet in length, 32 feet beam, and, when provisioned