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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 4 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 10: the Dial. (search)
ng formidable. It was directed even at the very moderate peculiarities of Emerson; the Knickerbocker, a New York monthly, making great fun of his opening essay, which it derided as literary euphuism. But the chief assault fell upon Alcott's Orphic Sayings, which provoked numerous parodies, the worst of which Mr. Alcott composedly pasted into his diary, indexing them, with his accustomed thoroughness and neatness, as Parodies on Orphic Sayings. Epithets, too, were showered about as freely as iOrphic Sayings. Epithets, too, were showered about as freely as imitations; the Philadelphia Gazette, for instance, calling the editors of the new journal zanies, Bedlamites, and considerably madder than the Mormons. It will convey some impression of the difficulties which Margaret Fuller, as leading editor, had to meet, when we consider that, all this time, Mr. Alcott and, perhaps, others of the stricter school of Transcendentalism, were shaking their heads over the Dial as being timid, compromising, and, in fact, rather a worldly and conventional affair
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: transcendentalism (search)
t. The journal discussed questions of theology and philosophy; it contained papers on art, music, and literature, especially German literature; translations from ancient Oriental Scriptures ; original modem scriptures in the form of Alcott's Orphic Sayings; and finally, a good deal of verse. In this latter connection one of the most interesting features of The Dial to the present-day reader is the opportunity and encouragement it afforded to the literary genius of Thoreau. In addition to his unger, the last-named one of the poets of transcendentalism, now best remembered for the single line, If my bark sinks, 'tis to another sea. The Dial, needless to say, did not satisfy the public. Dozens of parodies, especially of the Orphic Sayings, were forthcoming, and (in the words of Colonel Higginson) epithets, too, were showered about as freely as imitations; the Philadelphia Gazette, for instance, calling the editors of the new journal zanies, Bedlamites, and considerably mad
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
ion of the divine Goodness, 79 On the prospect of planting Arts and learning in America, 214 On the rise and progress of the differences between great Britain and her American colonies, 140 On the Sleep of plants, 183 One-Hoss Shay, the, 65 Optimist, the, 244 Oralloosa, 222, 225 Original journals (of Lewis and Clark), 205 Original poems (Fessenden), 180 Original poems, serious and entertaining, 180 Ormond, 290 Ornithology (Wilson), 180 Orphan, the, 117 Orphic Sayings, 341 Osawattomie Brown, 227 Ossian, 177 Ossoli, Marquis, 343 Othello, 225 Otis, James, 30 Otis, James, Jr., 125,126, 127, 128, 129, Otway, 116, 117 Ouabi, or the virtues of nature, 178 Over-soul, the, 336, 352 Ovid, 16 Owen, Robert, 339 Owen, Robert Dale, 225 P Paine, Robert Treat, Jr., 178-179 Paine, Thomas, 74, 77, 91, 99, 102, 123, 140 1, 142, 4, 144, 67 Pamela, 64, 284 Pamphlets on the Constitution, 148 n. Papers on literature and art,
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
the lasso over my neck yet, and i old boss as I am now, if I see the lasso in the air, I snort and gallop off, determined to be a free horse to the last, and put up with the consequent lack of grooming and stabling. The house of the Alcotts took my fancy greatly. When they bought the place the house was so very old that it was thrown into the bargain, with the supposition that it was fit for nothing but fire-wood. But Mr. Alcott has an architectural taste more intelligible than his Orphic Sayings. He let every old rafter and beam stay in its place, changed old ovens and ash-holes into Saxon-arched alcoves, and added a wash-woman's old shanty to the rear. The result is a house full of queer nooks and corners, and all manner of juttings in and out. It seems as if the spirit of some old architect had brought it from the Middle Ages and dropped it down in Concord; preserving much better resemblance to the place whence it was brought than does the Virgin Mary's house, which the ang