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rain now crossed the creek undisturbed, and ascended the heights which command Carthage from the north, this side of Spring River. Here the enemy again took position. His centre slowly advanced upon us, while his cavalry came upon us with great rapidity, in order to circumvent our two wings and gain the Springfield road. Deeming it of the utmost importance to keep open my communication with Mount Vernon and Springfield, I ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Wolff with two pieces of artillery (Lieut. Schaeffer, of the second battery) to pass through Carthage, and occupy the eastern heights on the Sarcoxie road. Capt. Cramer, with two companies, (Indest and Tois,) was ordered to follow him, in order to protect the western part of the city against a hostile movement in this direction. Our rear took possession of the city, in order to give the rest of the troops time for rest, as they had marched 22 miles on the 4th, and 18 miles more during the day, exposed to a burning sun, and almost withou
e concerned: On Friday, the 9th of August, Gen. Lyon informed me that it was his intention to attack the enemy in his camp at Wilson's Creek, on the morning of the 10th; that the attack should be made from two sides, and that I should take command of the left. The troops assigned to me consisted of the Second Brigade, Missouri Volunteers--900 men — infantry of the Third and Fifth regiments, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Albert and Col. Salomon, and six pieces of artillery, under Lieuts. Schaeffer and Schuetzenbach; besides, two companies of regular cavalry, belonging to the command of Major Sturgis. I left Camp Fremont, on the south side of Springfield, at 6 1/2 o'clock, on the evening of the 9th, and arrived at daybreak within a mile of the enemy's camp. I advanced slowly toward the camp, and, after taking forward the two cavalry companies from the right and left, I cut off about forty men of the enemy's troops, who were coming from the camp in little squads to get water a