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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 52 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 41 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 36 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 36 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Robert C. Schenck or search for Robert C. Schenck in all documents.

Your search returned 87 results in 7 document sections:

most severe fire of the enemy, alike merit his entire approbation. To Brig.-Gen. Schenck, for his advice and counsel, and to the officers and men of the Eighty-se R. H. Milroy, Brigadier-General. W. G. George, A. A.G. Report of Brig.-General Schenck. headquarters Schenck's brigade, Mountain Department, camp FrankliSchenck's brigade, Mountain Department, camp Franklin, May 14. Col. Albert Tracy, A. A.G., Headquarters mountain Department: I have had the honor, in my despatches heretofore transmitted through you, to inform the ike road to the southward. I am, very respectfully, your ob't servant, Robert C. Schenck. Brigadier-General Commanding. Colonel N. C. McLean's report. hefteen miles from McDowell, but found no force. On returning to camp I found Gen. Schenck had come up with three regiments, namely, the Eighty-second and Fifty-fifth ers and men behaved nobly, eliciting the warmest praise from Gens. Fremont and Schenck. Gen. Milroy who admires bravery, has issued an order thanking the men for the
fully, J. C. Fremont, Major-General. General Schenck's report. headquarters Schenck's briSchenck's brigade, Mountain Department, camp at Mt. Jackson, Va., June 12. Col. Albert Tracy, A. A.G.: I havem, very respectfully, your ob't servant, Robert C. Schenck, Brigadier-General. Cincinnati Comme a background of indescribable beauty. General Schenck was assigned the right. His forces were formed the right. Between Milroy's right and Schenck's left lay the Sixtieth Ohio, Col. Trimble, a right and in front. Captain Morgedant, of Gen. Schenck's staff, in a reconnoissance, discovered thfore them. This, with a combined movement of Schenck, Milroy having already penetrated the centre,e troops were early formed in line of battle, Schenck now taking the centre and Milroy the right. 8 Bohlen's brigade80 Cluseret's brigade,17 Schenck's brigade,14 Bucktails,8   Total,664 s too amusing to omit. Capt. Morgedant, of Gen. Schenck's staff, happened, in the midst of the figh[4 more...]
War: there was no collision with the enemy after dark last night. This morning we renewed the march against him, entering the woods in battle order, his cavalry appearing on our flanks, Gen. Blenker had the left, Gen. Milroy the right, and Gen. Schenck the centre, with a reserve of Gen. Stahl's brigade and Gen. Bayard's. The enemy was found to be in full retreat on Port Republic, and our advance found his rear-guard barely across the river, and the bridge in flames. Our advance came in so sollowing this regiment, the Forty-fifth New-York, the Bucktail Rifles, of General Bayard's brigade, and General Milroy's brigades. One of the Bucktail companies has lost all of its officers, commissioned and non-commissioned. The loss in General Schenck's brigade was less, although he inflicted severe loss on the enemy, principally by artillery fire. Of my staff I lost a good officer killed, Captain Nicholas Dunka. Many horses were killed in our batteries, which the enemy repeatedly att
Doc. 53.-Fremont's pursuit of Jackson. New-York Tribune account. Fremont's headquarters, Mount Jackson, Va., June 3, 1862. Gen. Fremont left Franklin on Sunday, May twenty-fifth. His troops were exhausted by previous forced marches to relieve Schenck and Milroy, from which they had not had time to recruit, and were weak from want of food. The first seven miles of road were only just not absolutely impassable by wagons. It was just such a road as cannot be found in the East, nor where an army has not passed. Wounded and sick were left at Franklin, because an attempt to carry them would have killed them. Nevertheless, with all its train of wagons, the army marched fifteen miles the first day. The next it reached Petersburgh, thirty miles from Franklin, at noon, and halted till Tuesday morning. Orders were then issued that knapsacks, tents, and baggage of every description that could possibly be dispensed with should be left behind. The knapsacks were stored in house
hat division, and rendered good service. Generals Schenck and Milroy, of Sigel's corps, exhibited gld of battle on the night of the thirtieth, Gen. Schenck being severely wounded on that day. I mutake position behind him. The division of General Schenck also crossed the river, and the infantry el McLean, who, under the direction of Brig.-General Schenck, was briskly engaged with the left of re. This movement could not be executed by Gen. Schenck with his whole division, as he became brisk Stevens to take position on the right of General Schenck--the battery on an eminence in front and as ordered to go forward and take position on Schenck's left. I pressed forward through the woods ward my regiments, the enemy falling back. Gen. Schenck's division was off to my left, and that of reported to me for duty, informing me that Gen. Schenck had been seriously wounded and his command just starting. You also directed to order Gen. Schenck to fall gradually back, as he was too far f[22 more...]
message from Gen. Pope at Culpeper announcing the approach of Jackson in that direction, and also an order to have his corps d'armee on the march within an hour. At the expiration of the hour the entire body was in motion. The division of Gen. Schenck led, that of Gen. Schurz followed. General Schenck had been ill several days, but the order to march reached him so that he was able to take the saddle and lead his men. At Hazel River the column halted for the night. In the morning, learninGeneral Schenck had been ill several days, but the order to march reached him so that he was able to take the saddle and lead his men. At Hazel River the column halted for the night. In the morning, learning that the corps would not move in several hours, your correspondent left it, and set out for Culpeper alone, reaching that point at half-past 10 A. M. Upon arriving there, the army, gathering from different directions, was in a great state of excitement. Jackson had been discovered in great force the day before, and had given Gen. Bayard a slap in the face for his audacity, which he will not forget for some time. Jackson is twenty, Jackson is thirty, Jackson is fifty thousand strong, was hea
hat division, and rendered good service. Generals Schenck and Milroy, of Sigel's corps, exhibited gre. This movement could not be executed by Gen. Schenck with his whole division, as he became briskts were posted between General Milroy and General Schenck, and two others with two mounted batterie they could go. I also sent one regiment of Gen. Schenck's division to the left of our position as aas ordered to go forward and take position on Schenck's left. I pressed forward through the woods to me and reported that he had been sent by Gen. Schenck to support me. He inquired where he should e rear and left, and to place myself behind Gen. Schenck's division on the open ground not far from , who took his position on our left; and at Gen. Schenck's suggestion he sent a battery to our rightrtillery fire now became very severe, and General Schenck was convinced that it was very essential it is made without any communication with General Schenck, he being severely wounded, and prevented[20 more...]