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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 40 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 15 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 7 5 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Schimmelfennig or search for Schimmelfennig in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
is, and has been for some time. exposed day and night to the fire of your guns. Very respectfully, etc., R. S. Ripley, Brigadier-General Commanding. General Schimmelfennig, Commanding United States Forces, Morris and Folly Islands, etc. There is much to be said against exercising this kind of warfare; and exposing the li A plan was laid between General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren to make a diversion by cutting the railroad between Charleston and Savannah. Generals Foster, Schimmelfennig and Hatch were to land, each with a force considered adequate for the occasion, while General Birney was to go into the North Edisto, and as high as possible, to destroy the railroad. The Navy was to enter the Stono to co-operate with General Schimmelfennig. One or two gun-boats were to ascend the North Edisto, and co-operate with General Birney to secure his landing. On the 2d day of July the Monitors Lehigh and Montauk crossed the Stono bar, while the remaining naval force consis
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
Stono to press the right flank of the enemy, while the gun-boat McDonough was sent with a mortar schooner up the Filly branch to bear on his left flank. General Schimmelfennig, in command of the troops before Charleston, moved on the enemy's front from Cole's Island. Admiral Dahlgren also sent orders to Lieutenant Hayward, commanch guns on Cummings' Point, to open on Sullivan's Island and fire continuously through the night. The contiguous batteries were also put in operation by General Schimmelfennig, and the advance Monitors were ordered to open fire on Fort Moultrie. The cannonading during the night was sharp and continuous; the Confederates repliedd and drove off the enemy. Gun-boats were sent as far as they could go — about forty miles--up the Cooper River, to co-operate with an army force under General Schimmelfennig, to break up any parties of Confederate troops that might still linger in the vicinity; but it was found that the enemy's forces had all crossed the Sante