Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Albin Schoepf or search for Albin Schoepf in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 2 document sections:

where, on notice of Zollicoffer's approach, the commander, General Albin Schoepf, took a strong, intrenched position, known as Wild Cat, witssenger, 1862, p. 203. He took forty prisoners and some arms. General Schoepf reported his loss as five killed and eleven wounded. As th These were inconsiderable skirmishes. On Sherman's right flank, Schoepf was pushed forward, by Thomas, to London. At the same time the Und Thomas to withdraw behind the Kentucky River; and Thomas ordered Schoepf, who was at London, to retire to Crab Orchard. Schoepf fell back,Schoepf fell back, but with such precipitation as to produce all the features and consequences of a rout. The weather was inclement; the roads very bad; and t a general insurrection in East Tennessee was rendered abortive by Schoepf's sudden retreat and Zollicoffer's possession of the Gaps. With SSchoepf's column were Andrew Johnson and other civilian leaders, whose presence was expected to give a powerful impulse to a great popular upr
Chapter 26: battle of Fishing Creek. Situation in January. Western Kentucky. Eastern Kentucky. Humphrey Marshall. his strength. James A. Garfield. his attack at Prestonburg. subsequent operations. sketch of Felix K. Zollicoffer. his character. his movements in the autumn. Mill Springs. General Johnston's warnings disregarded. sketch of George B. Crittenden. A. Schoepf. skirmishing. Thomas's advance. his force. Mill Spring. Fishing Creek. Confederate strength. Crittenden's night-march. attack. Walthall and battle. curious incident. strenuous combat. Zollicoffer's death. the retreat. the Federals follow,. Crittenden gets across the River. deplorable plight of the Confederates. their retreat. the losses. Zollicoffer's body. Slanders on Crittenden. disparity in arms. General Johnston's considerate treatment of Crittenden. Thomas's movements. the movement of the Federal army, which had been frustrated in November, was renewed with better