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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
rn generals and Northern writers attribute to him, then the story of Gettysburg and of the war would have been far different. Sherman's Historical raid. By H. V. Boynton. Cincinnati: Wilstach, Baldwin & Co. The author has kindly sent us a copy of this able and scathing review of Sherman's Memoirs, and we have read it with very great interest. He shows most conclusively from the official records that Sherman has done great injustice to Grant, Buell, Rosecrans, Thomas, McPherson, Schofield, and almost every other officer to whom he alludes in his book, and he carries the war into Africa by severely criticising Sherman's generalship, upon some of his most important fields, and showing that he was actually saved from terrible disaster again and again by the very men whom he now disparages. We cannot, of course, accept all that General Boynton has written; but we rejoice to see this well merited rebuke to the General of the Army who not only makes himself the hero of his own
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 8: the encampment. (search)
Hazen commanding (Sherman's old corps), and the Seventeenth Corps under Blair, together with the Army of Georgia, commanded now by Slocum, composed of the Fourteenth Corps (part of Thomas' old Army of the Cumberland), now under Davis, and the Twentieth Corps under Mower,--this latter composed of the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps of the Army of the Potomac sent to Sherman after Gettysburg, with Howard and Slocum. That part of Sherman's old army known as the Army of the Ohio, now commanded by Schofield, and made up of the Twenty-third Corps under Cox and the Tenth Corps under Terry,--of Fort Fisher fame,was not brought to this encampment. The fame of these men excited our curiosity and wish to know them better. Although not much interchange of visiting was allowed, we started out with very pleasant relations,--which unfortunately not being very deep-rooted soon withered. Still we admired them at a distance, and had it in our own hands to keep up that kind of a friendship. I am sp
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Dalton-Atlanta operations. (search)
south end of Kenesaw, and on a hill near, were outside of our position --not occupied by our line, and if at all, only by pickets, and General Sherman was deceived by reports of efforts to retake them and night attacks, which were never made by our troops. If the Confederate troops were so incessantly beaten, it is unaccountable that they were permitted to remain before Marietta four weeks, and then shifted their ground only to avoid losing their communications. The attack on Hooker and Schofield on the 22d, was made against orders by General Hood with Stevenson's Division, supported by Hindman's. It was defeated by intrenched artillery. But the troops held the ground they gained long enough to remove their dead and wounded. On the 25th, an attack like this was made on Stevenson's Division by the troops that had repulsed it 6n the 22d, and they were repelled with as heavy a loss as they had inflicted then. But this affair escapes General Sherman's notice. Pages 60 and 61: Th
ed toward Dalton, where Johnston's little army now was-every ear was strained to catch the first echo of the thunder about to roll so ominously among the Georgia mountains. Upon General Grant's elevation to the chief command, General W. T. Sherman had been left in charge in the West. Not discouraged by the failure of Grant's quadruple advance, two months before, Sherman divided his army-like that operating on the Rapidaninto three corps. Thomas, leading the center, or direct advance; Schofield, the left on the North-east, and McPherson the right on the South-west-he moved upon Dalton, almost simultaneously with Grant's passage of the Rapidan. And like Grant, he essayed a flank movement; but with far different result. There was another point of similarity — the great disparity of numbers. Sherman could not have had in all, far short of 80,000 men; while Johnston's greatest exertions could not collect at Dalton an effective force of 35,000. Many of these, too, were local tr
further suspension of hostilities and a final agreement with General Johnston, which terminates the war as to the armies under his command and the country east of the Chattahoochee. Copies of the terms of convention will be furnished Major-Generals Schofield, Gillmore and Wilson,who are specially charged with the execution of its details in the Department of North Carolina, Department of the South, and at Macon and Western Georgia. General Schofield will procure at once the necessary General Schofield will procure at once the necessary blanks, and supply the Army Commanders, that uniformity may prevail; and great care must be taken that the terms and stipulations on our part be fulfilled with the most scrupulous fidelity, whilst those imposed on our hitherto enemies be received in a spirit becoming a brave and generous army. Army Commanders may at once loan to the inhabitants such of the captured mules, horses, wagons and vehicles as can be spared from immediate use; and the Commanding Generals of Armies may issue provisi
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 13: campaign in Virginia.-Bristol Station.-mine Run.-Wilderness. (search)
ywhere about here? Lee, who had campaigned against McClellan, Pope, Burnside, Hooker, and Meade, had now to measure swords with Grant. Sheridan, too, made his first bow in Virginia at this time. He had served with distinction under Halleck in the West, and when Grant asked for the best officer that could be found to be his chief of cavalry, Halleck suggested Sheridan, and his suggestion was instantly adopted. This officer graduated in 1853 at West Point, was a classmate of McPherson, Schofield, and Hood, had served in the Fourth Infantry-Grant's old regiment-and was thirty years of age when he first drew his sabre in Virginia in 1864. The Federal Government laid at the feet of Grant its unbounded treasures. His Virginia army was increased to one hundred and eighteen thousand men of all arms and three hundred and eighteen cannon, as some authorities have it; but the report of the Union Secretary of War to the first session of the Thirty-ninth Congress gave one hundred and fo
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 14: siege of Petersburg. (search)
uth to concentrate such troops as he could in Sherman's front, and had reported that Sherman would move via Greensborough and Weldon to Petersburg, or unite with Schofield at Raleigh. Beauregard has a difficult task to perform, said Lee to Breckinridge, Secretary of War, and one of his best officers, General Hardee, is incapaciruary 21st, Sheridan to move up the Valley, and Stoneman from Knoxville. What, then, will become of those sections of the country? Bragg will be forced back by Schofield, I fear, and until I abandon James River nothing can be sent from the army. Grant is preparing to draw out by his left with the intent of enveloping me; he may tion of supplying his enormous army, moving from its base to the interior, would retard him after the first few days' march. Sherman, after his junction with Schofield at Goldsborough, had nearly ninety thousand men of the three arms. Johnston, having only eighteen thousand seven hundred and sixty-one, telegraphed Lee that wit
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
142, 422. Bohemia, the blind King of, 420. Bolivar Heights, 202. Boswell, Captain, killed at Chancellorsville, 251. Brackett, Captain Albert G., mentioned, 54. Bragg, General, Braxton, mentioned, 47, 54; re-enforced, 313; opposed to Schofield, 370. Branch, General L. O. B., killed at Antietam, 215. Breckinridge, General John C., mentioned, 83, 341, 369. Bristol Station, 187, 189. Brockenbrough's brigade, 288. Brockenbrough, Judge John W., 403. Brown, John, mentioned Russell's division, 318, 319. Rust, Colonel, Albert, 119, 120, 121. Sanders, General, killed, 363. Sanford, General, Charles, 105. Santa Anna, General, 31, 32, 38. San Jacinto, battle of, 31. Schenck, General, mentioned, 143. Schofield, General John M., joins Sherman, 372. Scott, General, Winfield, mentioned, 19, 33, 40, 44, 46; notice of, 48; mentioned, 52, 54, 85, 101, 103, 105, 176; autobiography, 374; mentioned, 423. Seceding States, the, 84. Second United State
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Retrospect of the campaign-sherman's movements-proposed movement upon Mobile-a painful accident-ordered to report at Cairo (search)
as a favor. It was simply in line of duty, though out of my department. The General-in-chief having decided against me, the depletion of an army, which had won a succession of great victories, commenced, as had been the case the year before after the fall of Corinth when the army was sent where it would do the least good. By orders, I sent to Banks a force of 4,000 men; returned the 9th corps to Kentucky and, when transportation had been collected, started a division of 5,000 men to Schofield in Missouri where Price was raiding the State. I also detached a brigade under Ransom to Natchez, to garrison that place permanently. This latter move was quite fortunate as to the time when Ransom arrived there. The enemy happened to have a large number, about 5,000 head, of beef cattle there on the way from Texas to feed the Eastern armies, and also a large amount of munitions of war which had probably come through Texas from the Rio Grande and which were on the way to Lee's and other
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Operations in Mississippi-Longstreet in east Tennessee-commissioned Lieutenant-General-Commanding the armies of the United States-first interview with President Lincoln (search)
ten thousand men, besides Stanley's division which was already to the east, into East Tennessee and notified [John M.] Schofield, who was now in command in East Tennessee, of this movement of troops into his department and also of the reinforcementampaign. About this time General Foster, who had been in command of the Department of the Ohio after Burnside until Schofield relieved him, Washington, D. C., December 29, 1863 Maj.-General U. S. Grant: General Foster has asked to be relief disability from old wounds. Should his request be granted, who would you like as his successor? It is possible that Schofield will be sent to your command. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief (Official.) advised me that he thought it would be a gooble with his poor teams, nearly starved, to keep up supplies until the railroads were repaired. He soon fell back. Schofield also had to return for the same reason. He could not carry supplies with him, and Longstreet was between him and the s
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