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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
J. B. Allen, J. J. Autrey, C. B. Butler, W. J. Brooks, J. W. Cotter, J. B. Cotter, H. A. Campbell, Z. J. Floyd, C. C. Hodge, T. C. Hammock, J. H. Hammock, W. L. Jeter, W. A. Mangham, B. F. Meadows, L. G. Morris, J. Prather, G. F. Shank, J. H. Stephenson, W. C. Smith, J. M. F. Welch, F. P. Yarborough, W. H. Hardaway, L. C. Mimms, R. H. Cross, W. W. Canther, G. C. Chambers, J. W. Garner, W. H. Gardner, W. J. Hurt, H. M. Jackson, Jorden Keele, R. L. Night, John Schofield, J. S. Skinner, B. S. Warner, B. F. Finley, T. H. Burnett, N. G. Braszell, Private J. M. Hank, T. W. Joyner, J. A. Karr, T. J. Lee, H. S. Osborn, J. E. Smith, T. D. Shaddix, John Shaddix, C. T. Shaw, R. H. Cain, R. Barnett, J. M. Cason, J. J. Henderson, J. T. Izell, W. Johnson, J. M. Jarrell, R. E. Lovejoy, W. F. Pemberton, R. Patillo, W. H. B. Selman, Jas. Sebring, P. Sargent, T. Speake, R. Thomas, H. C. Thomas, A. Vickers, H. Whitton, J. W. Wright,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
nford, Capt. T. V., 94. Sapps, Lt. N. W., 204. Sartain, Capt. H. H., 413. Satterfield, Capt. R. W., 95. Saunders, Lt. J. E., 402. Saunders, Col. J. S., 3. Saunders, W. Hunter, 18. Saunders, Col. W. L., 275. Savage, Lt. J. J., 314. Savage, Lt. J. L., 314. Savell, Capt. T. P., 424. Scales, Gen. A. M.; Brigade of, 381. Scales, Maj. J. T., 253-4. Scales, Maj. N. E., 358. Scarborough, Ass't Surg. G. T., 441. Scarborough, Ass't Surg. W. M., 368. Schley, Surg. C. C., 212. Schofield, Lt .J. T., 72. Schwing, Capt W. F., 326. Scogin, Lt. W. C., 394. Scott, Capt. D., 94. Scott, Maj., Fred. R., 2. Scott, U. S A., Gen., XV. Scott, Lieut. J. G., 286. Scott, Capt. J. W., 73. Scott, Lt., P. Gay, 467. Scott, Ass't Surg. W. W., 239. Scruggs, Col. L. H., 144. Scruggs, Maj. W. H., 144. Sears, Lt. J. B., 457. Seigle, Lt. T. L., 65. Selden, Lt., John, 17. Selden, Capt. J. A., 2. Sellers, Capt., Samuel, 314. Semmes' Brigade, 182. Semple, Hospital Steward R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
l with which the Confederate soldiers were made. All signs indicated that the end was near at hand. Lee had abandoned Petersburg and Richmond, though this was unknown to us until several days thereafter, as I shall later on show; all of North Carolina east of the Wilmington and Weldon railroad had been given up; and Sherman had made his memorable march through Georgia to the sea, and through the Carolinas, having as his objective point Goldsboro, where he purposed to form a junction with Schofield, moving from Newberne and Kinston, and with Terry, moving from Wilmington. This was accomplished by him on the 23d of March, 1865. The giant arms of an octopus were rapidly closing upon the Confederacy in her final desperate but grand struggle for independence. Just one month previous to the junction of these three armies, flushed as they were with victory, that old war-horse, General Joe Johnston, had relieved Beauregard at Charlotte, N. C., and was charged with the difficult task of c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5 (search)
And he said: Bishop, when I heard your government had removed Johnston from command I was as happy as if I had reinforced Sherman with a large army corps. Schofield. During the past year General Johnston, responding to me, said in his emphatic manner: Yes, I consider General Schofield much the ablest soldier and the higheGeneral Schofield much the ablest soldier and the highest gentleman who has occupied that office since I have known it. Such a tribute from such a source must be very gratifying to such a soldier as Schofield is. And you know just praise is the breath of the soldier's life and its highest aim. The best shot. The General bitterly deplored the long inaction which his severe wounSchofield is. And you know just praise is the breath of the soldier's life and its highest aim. The best shot. The General bitterly deplored the long inaction which his severe wounds at Seven Pines enforced upon him. When he was lying at Mr. Joseph H. Crenshaw's, in Richmond, where he was brought from the field, his medical director, Dr. Fauntleroy, told me an old Virginian called to pay his respects and sympathy. He Said: Not only do we deplore this cruel affliction upon you, General, but we feel it to b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial services in Memphis Tenn., March 31, 1891. (search)
ge November, 1863. Shortly thereafter, by May, 1864, he had collected and mobilized forty-three thousand men of all arms, and was subsequently reinforced by General Polk's and other forces, which increased his army to about sixty thousand. May 14, 1864, General Sherman advanced on General Johnston's position at Dalton, Ga., with the combined forces of three Federal armies—the Cumberland, under General George H. Thomas; Tennessee, under General James B. McPherson, and the Ohio, under General John Schofield-aggregating ninety-nine thousand strong, with two hundred and fifty-four guns. And thus was inaugurated one of the most memorable campaigns of the war—one that lasted more than two months with daily fighting of some character. Sherman did not attack Johnston's position at Dalton in force, but making slight demonstrasions at Mill Creek Gap, flanked it by sending McPherson's corps through Snake Gap with a view of striking his rear at Resacca. But there he found a portion of Johnst
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 33 (search)
at Colonel Pegram's quarters yesterday afternoon to hear Bishop Lay. His text was the importance of the Holy Ghost, and the sermon was a most excellent one. Everything continues quiet in our front. Eight Yankee deserters have surrendered to my command since my return. Desertions from the enemy are of nightly occurrence. Night before last there was loud cheering all along the Yankee line, and our men responded to it with deafening yells. A deserter told us that it was reported that Schofield had captured twenty thousand Georgia militia, and that they had been ordered to cheer. He also stated that there was great dissatisfaction in the Yankee army, and that more men would desert if they could get a chance. The Sixty-first New York was relieved a few nights since by another regiment, as it was feared that the greater part of it would come over to us. They complain of too much work and drilling and an insufficiency of rations, the latter causing them to spend all their money wi