Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. M. Schofield or search for J. M. Schofield in all documents.

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erce glare. General Lyon finding himself short of provisions, his men weary and footsore, many of them sick from intemperate use of water and green fruits, with a powerful enemy encamped in front, whom he could not chase by reason of the precautions against surprises and flank movements — moreover, a large force of the enemy in the direction of Sarcoxie, and the necessity of keeping open his communication with Springfield — called a consultation with Brigadier-Generals Sweeney, Siegel; Majors Schofield, Shepherd, Conant, Sturgis; Captains Totten and Shaeffer, when it was determined to retire toward Springfield. This conclusion seems to be well-founded when we reflect that the provisions for such an army must be transported from Rolla at great risk (of capture. Nothing could be found either for man or horse on the track of the rebels. Hardly had the decision been declared, when one of the cavalry scouts announced that he had witnessed the departure of McCullough's camp in the dire
t total silence reigned for a space of twenty minutes. Major Schofield now informed me of the death of Gen. Lyon, and reported there was Gen. Lyon to be found; and there, too, was Major Schofield, his principal staff officer. The coolness and equani I cannot too highly speak of the invaluable services Major Schofield rendered by the confidence his example inspired. Capt I beg to say here that I am under many obligations to Major Schofield, from whose memoranda of the movements of troops, &c.,o. Volunteers. Lt.-Colonel Merritt's report. J. M. Schofield, Acting Adjutant-General:-- dear sir: I have the honentirely cut off. After being wounded, he exclaimed to Major Schofield, The day is lost, but the Major said, No, General, leto wounds himself, he exclaimed wildly to his Adjutant, Major Schofield, that the day was lost, but the Major said No, let us er twice through his pants, barely scraping his knee. Major Schofield had a few of his whiskers trimmed off by a passing bul
would certainly have been pursued by a boastful and unpunished enemy, and very likely have his retreat entirely cut off. After being wounded, he exclaimed to Major Schofield, The day is lost, but the Major said, No, General, let us try once more. So they tried, and the General fell. It was now a little after nine o'clock, and as regiments had both been disabled from wounds, when the General had lost his own horse and received two wounds himself, he exclaimed wildly to his Adjutant, Major Schofield, that the day was lost, but the Major said No, let us try once again. So the General gave orders to rally the men into line without reference to regiments, frke himself was struck by a spent ball, then one tore through his blouse without injuring him, and another twice through his pants, barely scraping his knee. Major Schofield had a few of his whiskers trimmed off by a passing bullet, but was otherwise uninjured. Major Halderman, of the Kansas First, was slightly wounded. Two rebe