Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. M. Schofield or search for J. M. Schofield in all documents.

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f Hooker's corps. As I have already said, Schofield's corps is working east of the rebel positiohand, reports before daylight to McPherson. Schofield comes drifting in the same direction from hich I have referred to before as operating on Schofield's left. The particulars are not fully given A party of officers, among whom were General Schofield, Palmer, Thomas, Elliott, and Whipple, wited the force that should attempt it. Could Schofield proceed down the valley, along the east sides works; Howard being upon the extreme left, Schofield next in order. Hooker next, Palmer next, Los lost, and staff officers reported that General Schofield could obtain no intelligence from it. nd meant to thrust a heavy column in between Schofield and the cavalry before these could be unitedrps had been relieved from line of battle on Schofield's right in the forenoon by the division of Gd the cavalry again in the rear of them, General Schofield supposing that if any attack were made u[25 more...]
t of Stanley extending to the base of Rocky Face. The day has not brought on a regular engagement, though it has witnessed the repulse of a gallant charge made by two brigades of Geary's division of Hooker's corps. As I have already said, Schofield's corps is working east of the rebel positions, while Hooker's bears south-west of Dalton, and McPherson, with a large army, is aiming at Resacca, in the rear of the rebel works at Dalton. Geary's division is in front of Dug Gap, in John's Moulank. Kilpatrick occupies our right with his cavalry. Stoneman is on the left. The failure of one or two storming parties is expected before Johnston can be expelled. His attention will soon be called to other localities than Dalton. General Schofield, with his corps, to-day reached Newton's left, and this afternoon moved up Crow Valley, to the left of Rocky Face Ridge. He will possibly strike the enemy on his right flank, simultaneously with an attack on his left by a column now moving
works and fortifications to the right of Dalton. The movement had the desired effect, compelling the enemy to open his artillery, and expose the position of his batteries. From five until after dark a heavy fire was kept up, and when it ceased Stanley was far in advance of Davis' position of the morning, and extended his line some distance up the slope of Rocky Face, supported by General Wood's division. With the exception of Davis' division, the Fourteenth corps was not engaged. General Schofield, with his corps, succeeded about one o'clock in getting up and confronting the enemy's fortifications on the left of Dalton. Brisk firing was heard in the direction of his position, and I learn to-night that he holds, like the centre and right wings of the army, every foot gained during the day. A despatch was received at noon from General McPherson, who had occupied Snake Gap, near Resacca, in Chattanooga Mountains, with his force, on Sunday night, which was within six miles of Re
m the Rapidan and Richmond. That the enemy cannot spare many troops from the front is evident, inasmuch as they have but two corps in our front. The Twenty-third corps, which had been developing the enemy on the left of Rocky Face, this morning met the enemy in very heavy force, and retired to his position of yesterday, about one mile in the rear, where he held the enemy in check. Yesterday a brigade of McCook's cavalry division, which has been making demonstrations for some days on Schofield's left, engaged two rebel brigades of infantry. The charge was led by Colonel La Grange, of the First Wisconsin cavalry, who, everybody agrees, is one of the bravest of the brave brigade commanders of cavalry. After frequent assaults upon the wall of rebel infantry, our cavalry was repulsed, Colonel La Grange captured, after two horses were shot under him, and a large portion of the command wounded or captured, including Captain Starr, of the Second Indiana, who escaped from his captors,
es ever marshalled could not successfully storm the position, if occupied by thirty thousand determined men. No movement up to dark had been made by the troops. The camp-fires shone brightly — nothing in the enemy's range of vision had been moved. The night was dark, and by the time it had fairly overspread nature, a sudden, stealthy life was infused into the hitherto recumbent troops. Hooker moves his corps to the right, and being near at hand, reports before daylight to McPherson. Schofield comes drifting in the same direction from his fruitless position east of Rocky Face. Other corps follow; perhaps, when daylight comes, the enemy will discover that he has permission, if he chooses, to mass on the division or two in his front, which being done and their lines broken, he may pass through to Chattanooga — all this if he pleases. But there is an ominous drift towards Resacca. The price of his looking at Chattanooga would be Atlanta and liberty. Sherman, at last, has indica
etached Colonel Grosvenor's brigade from my immediate control during the operations before Nashville, and it did not again rejoin its command until it reached Murfreesboro, marching by way of Franklin, Tennessee. December 15. According to directions from the Major-General commanding, the division moved at four o'clock A. M., and abandoning its line of defences, relieved a portion of the troops of the Fourth army corps (Brigadier-General Wood, commanding) and Twenty-third corps, (Major-General Schofield, commanding), and held their exterior line of works-picketing also the front — from the Ackland place to a point north of Fort Negley, and commanding the approaches to the city by the Granny White, Franklin, Nolensville and Murfreesboro turnpikes. Details were furnished to support the batteries of artillery in the line, and to garrison Fort Mirton and redoubt Casino. The brigade of Lieutenant-Colonel Grosvenor (temporarily reporting to Colonel Morgan) was engaged during the day in
December 15. According to directions from the Major-General commanding, the division moved at four o'clock A. M., and abandoning its line of defences, relieved a portion of the troops of the Fourth army corps (Brigadier-General Wood, commanding) and Twenty-third corps, (Major-General Schofield, commanding), and held their exterior line of works-picketing also the front — from the Ackland place to a point north of Fort Negley, and commanding the approaches to the city by the Granny White, Franklin, Nolensville and Murfreesboro turnpikes. Details were furnished to support the batteries of artillery in the line, and to garrison Fort Mirton and redoubt Casino. The brigade of Lieutenant-Colonel Grosvenor (temporarily reporting to Colonel Morgan) was engaged during the day in the assault on the enemy's works near Raine's house, and was the only portion of the division in the fight. It suffered considerably in killed and wounded, and behaved creditably. The Twenty-fourth Indiana batter
well pounded by the artillery from our lines. This was the first success of the day, and it greatly exalted the enthusiasm of the troops. Our casualties were small, compared with the success. Up to this time, the Twenty-third corps, Major-General Schofield, commanding, had been held in reserve in rear of the Fourth corps and Major-General A. J. Smith's command; but shortly after the assault on Montgomery's Hill, I received a message from the commanding General of the forces, to the effect that he had ordered General Schofield to move his command to the right, to prolong General Smith's front, and directing me to move my reserves as much to the right as could be done compatibly with the safety of my own front. The order was at once obeyed by shifting the reserve brigade of each division to the right. The entire line of the corps was steadily pressed forward, and the enemy engaged throughout its whole front. The battery accompanying each division was brought to the front, and b
ich to open signal communication between General Schofield, who was on the extreme right, the town Knob, and immediately opened with Hooker and Schofield. Subsequently communication was opened with Dodge and Blair on the left, and Hooker and Schofield on the right, were not inactive. At the momconnoitering the situation a short time, General Schofield rode away to the ford, which is just at e right, or rather the right wing--under General Schofield's temporary command — is in statu quo, ae some additional bridges at Resaca, but General Schofield had more trouble, and made a wide circui General McPherson's about Kingston, and General Schofield's at Cassville depot and toward the Etowferry bridges, and to march by Buckhead; General Schofield, already across at the mouth of Soap's cand success, sending them to the rear of General Schofield and Thomas, and not drawing back from Detion at Couch's early in the afternoon. General Schofield, being closer to the enemy, who still cl[80 more...]
spectively by Generals Thomas, McPherson and Schofield, upon Johnston's army at Dalton; but findinge G(ap to turn it, while Generals Thomas and Schofield threatened it in front and on the north. Th joined Hood. On the night of the fifth General Schofield, with the advance of the Twenty-third coing up with our main force, commanded by General Schofield, at Franklin, on the thirtieth, assaulte all his expectations. During the night General Schofield fell back toward Nashville. This left tture of Hood south from Corinth, to send General Schofield, with his corps, east with as little del U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-General J. M. Schofield. Previous to giving these inst had visited Fort Fisher, accompanied by General Schofield, for the purpose of seeing for myself thousand; that if Wilmington was captured, General Schofield would go there; if not, he would be sent of March, opening up communication with General Schofield by way of Cape Fear river. On the fifte[6 more...]
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