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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 17: Second battle of Bull Bun (search)
h of Groveton, was faced northward and pushed forward toward Stonewall Jackson. McDowell with King's and Ricketts's divisions and Porter's corps was also ordered to come up to the left of Sigel. Sigel deployed his troops as early as 5 A. M. and moved carefully and steadily forward. Soon a stubborn resistance came from Jackson's chosen position. It was a hard battle that day, begun differently from the first battle of Bull Run, but not far from that point. Sigel put in the divisions of Schurz, Schenck, Milroy, and Reynolds, and kept on firing and gaining ground till noon, when the ardent Kearny arrived. By two o'clock Hooker and Reno also were on the ground. Pope coming up rearranged the battle front; he placed Kearny's troops on his right, Reynolds's on his left, with Hooker's and Reno's at the center, and then made a reserve. There was irregular fighting till about 4.30, when a desperate attack was made. Kearny and Hooker got nearer and nearer, firing and advancing, till
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 22: battle of Chancellorsville (search)
ssumed command at Stafford Court House, where General Carl Schurz was in charge. My coming sent Schurz back toSchurz back to his division and Schimmelfennig back to his brigade. The corps was then, in round numbers, 13,000 strong. re under the German commanders, Von Steinwehr and Carl Schurz, and one under Devens. One of Devens's brigades lderness Church and to the forks of the roads. General Schurz, in charge of the 3d division, took up the lineer General Devens, was deployed in the extension of Schurz's line, first along the turnpike westward, with simhis reserves to support the points most threatened; Schurz was to hold his regiments that were free from the lance made by Devens's reserve regiments and part of Schurz's division, which was on a side hill in an open fie to change the front of part of Devens's and all of Schurz's division. The rush of the enemy made this imposshis subordinates constantly on the qui vive; so did Schurz. Their actions and mine were identical. The Eleve
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 24: the battle of Gettysburg begun (search)
the distance is eleven miles. Steinwehr's and Schurz's were to follow a road, clearer and better, a dispatched immediately back to the columns of Schurz and Barlow. Riding into the town at your sideictating orders, assumed command of the field; Schurz to take the Eleventh Corps; Doubleday to hold he Emmittsburg and Taneytown roads, to Barlow, Schurz, and Steinwehr. The new orders were carried ttheir places on the right of the First Corps. Schurz ordered General Schimmelfennig (who had SchurzSchurz's division now) to advance briskly through Gettysburg and deploy on the right of the First Corps ine time occupy the enemy's attention, I ordered Schurz to push out a strong force from his front and ming in from the north and east. Reports from Schurz and Buford confirmed the alarming intelligencelar movement of Ewell's deployed lines against Schurz. The fighting became severe and reinforcementwly advancing. I then sent positive orders to Schurz and Doubleday to fall back to the cemetery as [2 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 25: the battle of Gettysburg; the second and third day (search)
corps went quickly to the right to hold the rough-wooded slopes from Culp's Hill to McAllister's Mill. Ames, Steinwehr, Schurz, Robinson, and Doubleday, with their respective divisions, remained substantially the same as I had located them on theiy-fifth New York, and Sixty-first Ohio, sent by me to his assistance from the Eleventh Corps. Lieutenant Colonel Otto, of Schurz's staff, who led this detachment, was also highly commended. I remember well when Otto promptly volunteered to guide t intrenched batteries of Major Osborn, whose fire was intended strongly to support that bastioned front of the cemetery. Schurz and I were standing near, side by side. At my request he faced Colonel Krzyzanowski's brigade about, now not over 800 meot long, for July 7th the two corps (the Fifth and the Eleventh) marched thirty miles to the Middletown Valley. The 8th, Schurz's division, was dispatched to Boonsboro. This preferred to support Buford's cavalry, which had some time before met the
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 26: transferred to the West; battle of Wauhatchie (search)
rybody who was fully awake said at once: Our men at Wauhatchie are attacked. Instantly I sent to my division commanders (Schurz and Steinwehr) to put their troops under arms. The word of command had hardly left me when Hooker's anxious message came: Hurry or you cannot save Geary. He has been attacked! The troops were quickly on foot. Schurz's men were that night especially alert and the first under arms. The road ran along at the base of the low hills which I have described, and which the Confederates were already quietly holding. Schurz was ordered to go on to Geary's relief, but he had hardly set out over the rocks and through the thickets, feeling his way to the west and north of the wagon road in the uncertain light, probably pidly along the road. He designated Colonel Orland Smith's brigade for this work for his division. A little farther on, Schurz sent General Tyndall's brigade to carry the hills on his left. As soon as these primary arrangements were effected, I
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 27: Chattanooga and the battle of Missionary Ridge (search)
ery commander how to point and serve his guns. Soon all the divisions were in place. Very quickly I passed into the woods to our left from brigade to brigade of Schurz and Steinwehr, and brought them up through the thickets to the Citico Creek. In truth, we of the Eleventh Corps were soon ahead of our neighbors and proud of it,s who were inclined to loiter in that region. Granger was pleased, and, the hard work of the morning being over, he gathered us around him-Sheridan, Baird, Wood, Schurz, Steinwehr and others — to tell us how the battle had been fought and to show us the way to fight all battles. It was, indeed, a successful reconnoissance, and,Dalton, and Knoxville, the wing of Thomas's army to which I belonged-probably about 20,000 strong, counting up the remaining divisions of the Eleventh Corps under Schurz and Von Steinwehr, and those of Geary and Ward belonging to the Twelfth Corps, with corps and artillery transportation reckoned in (for the latter especially affo