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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Seventh: return to the Senate. (search)
could be. Anxiety on that account might have been felt by his friends, but not by him. He seemed to be all-forgetful of himself, and to have his mind dwelling on the cause to which he was devoted, the race for which he was to plead, and on the responsibility under which he stood to his country, and to generations to come. There was something sublime in the orator, and the majesty with which he spoke. His speech and his conduct were fully endorsed by the Legislature of Massachusetts. Carl Schurz, writing from Milwaukee, said: Allow me to congratulate you on the success of your great speech. It did me good to hear again the true ring of the moral Anti-Slavery sentiment. If we want to demolish the Slave Power, we must educate the hearts of the people, no less than their heads. Joshua R. Giddings, so long the champion of Freedom, in Congress, wrote: My heart swells with gratitude to God that you are again permitted to stand in the Senate, and maintain the honor of the
could be. Anxiety on that account might have been felt by his friends, but not by him. He seemed to be all-forgetful of himself, and to have his mind dwelling on the cause to which he was devoted, the race for which he was to plead, and on the responsibility under which he stood to his country, and to generations to come. There was something sublime in the orator, and the majesty with which he spoke. His speech and his conduct were fully endorsed by the Legislature of Massachusetts. Carl Schurz, writing from Milwaukee, said: Allow me to congratulate you on the success of your great speech. It did me good to hear again the true ring of the moral Anti-Slavery sentiment. If we want to demolish the Slave Power, we must educate the hearts of the people, no less than their heads. Joshua R. Giddings, so long the champion of Freedom, in Congress, wrote: My heart swells with gratitude to God that you are again permitted to stand in the Senate, and maintain the honor of the
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
ely different policy,—the one which he first announced at Worcester,—repeated and reiterated in speeches in the Senate,—in his daily conversation, and in his broad correspondence with enlightened men all over Christendom. In England, France, and Germany, his views were widely made known, under the advocacy of the foremost of the Liberals, and their organs in England; by such men as Count Gasparin, and Edouard Laboulaye, of Paris; by Joshua R. Giddings, our Consul-General at Montreal; by Carl Schurz, then Minister to Spain; by William S. Thayer, Consul-General to Egypt; while at home, even such men as Orestes A. Brownson, the most vigorous thinker and writer of the Catholic Church—and, in fact, from all orders and classes of men, the Speech at Worcester had been warmly applauded, and the course he was afterwards taking, most earnestly sanctioned. Xiv. But while this thing was slowly righting itself in the councils of the administration, Mr. Sumner's voice was once more heard i
them touch it off themselves. While Mr. Sumner was disposed to render all the aid he could to Mr. Lincoln, he everywhere advocated a widely different policy,—the one which he first announced at Worcester,—repeated and reiterated in speeches in the Senate,—in his daily conversation, and in his broad correspondence with enlightened men all over Christendom. In England, France, and Germany, his views were widely made known, under the advocacy of the foremost of the Liberals, and their organs in England; by such men as Count Gasparin, and Edouard Laboulaye, of Paris; by Joshua R. Giddings, our Consul-General at Montreal; by Carl Schurz, then Minister to Spain; by William S. Thayer, Consul-General to Egypt; while at home, even such men as Orestes A. Brownson, the most vigorous thinker and writer of the Catholic Church—and, in fact, from all orders and classes of men, the Speech at Worcester had been warmly applauded, and the course he was afterwards taking, most earnestly san
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eleventh: his death, and public honors to his memory. (search)
three o'clock, this afternoon, March 11. Those present in the chamber when the Senator expired were his physicians, Senator Schurz, Judge Hoar, Mr. Hooper, Mr. Johnson and Mr. Downing. The sudden illness of Senator Sumner, which terminated fatalr, he would recognize those around him. Among those almost constantly in attendance in the Senator's bed-chamber were Senator Schurz, Judge E. Rockwood Hoar, Mr. Pierce, and Mr. Hooper. To those around him he frequently expressed regrets about theeldom so meet. Nearest to the head of the coffin sat the President; next to him Secretary Fish, and nearest the foot Senator Schurz. And here in the presence of this death, they were all moved alike to tears. The nation in its three branches, legimittee appointed to attend the funeral by the New York Chamber of Commerce. The party then comprised Senator Anthony, Carl Schurz, Gen. B. F. Butler, James G. Blaine, J. M. S. Williams, Daniel W. Gooch, Aaron A. Sargent, John Sherman, Richard J. Og
later, also, in weekly edition, any inadvertencies would be corrected. The Hon. Charles Sumner died at ten minutes before three o'clock, this afternoon, March 11. Those present in the chamber when the Senator expired were his physicians, Senator Schurz, Judge Hoar, Mr. Hooper, Mr. Johnson and Mr. Downing. The sudden illness of Senator Sumner, which terminated fatally, to-day, was known only to his physician and a few of his most intimate friends, last night. On Monday evening, he complaey did not like to take the responsibility. He grew worse; became unconscious, and at times delirious. Occasionally, however, he would recognize those around him. Among those almost constantly in attendance in the Senator's bed-chamber were Senator Schurz, Judge E. Rockwood Hoar, Mr. Pierce, and Mr. Hooper. To those around him he frequently expressed regrets about the unfinished condition of his works. He said: I should not regret this, if my book was finished, alluding to his speeches and
At precisely 12.20 the pall-bearers appeared at the door with the coffin. The great company, so fully representing the nation, rose and stood in profound silence as the coffin, covered with flowers, but open and so exposed that all could see, was carried slowly up to its place before the desk. The arrangement brought those together who, had not death stepped in, would seldom so meet. Nearest to the head of the coffin sat the President; next to him Secretary Fish, and nearest the foot Senator Schurz. And here in the presence of this death, they were all moved alike to tears. The nation in its three branches, legislative, executive and judicial, stood close around the coffin, and the people from all quarters of the land looked down upon it. The eyes of the great throng seemed to wander from the coffin to the one empty chair and unoccupied desk, and back to the features of the dead Senator in his coffin. The religious exercises were brief, lasting but half an hour, and at their clo
en the casket was conveyed to the Fifth Avenue Hotel and rested in a private parlor until the next morning, when it was escorted to the Grand Central Depot by a committee of the Union League. At New York the Congressional deputation, which embraced nearly every Massachusetts member, welcomed Messrs. A. A. Low, S. B. Chittenden, Cyrus W. Field, and Elliott C. Cowdin,—a committee appointed to attend the funeral by the New York Chamber of Commerce. The party then comprised Senator Anthony, Carl Schurz, Gen. B. F. Butler, James G. Blaine, J. M. S. Williams, Daniel W. Gooch, Aaron A. Sargent, John Sherman, Richard J. Oglesby, Augustus S. Merriman, Stephen A. Hurlbut, Eugene Hale, Charles Foster, Joseph H. Rainey, Charles Clayton, Henry J. Scudder, Samuel J. Randall, Joseph B. Beck, John Hancock, James Buffinton, Henry L. Dawes, George F. Hoar, E. R. Hoar, Henry L. Pierce, B. W. Harris, Samuel Hooper, Alvah Crocker and Mr. George M. Downing, President of the Civil Rights Council in Washin
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Twelfth: his character and fame. (search)
the Department of State. He prepared, at the time, a careful statement showing why the cordiality of those relations had been disturbed; and it was known that he intended to deliver that speech in the Senate. But his friends Mr. Trumbull and Carl Schurz, to whom his intention was made known, dissuaded him from his purpose, by appealing to his generous nature; and to this appeal he yielded. During three years he refrained from delivering it, suffering in silence the most offensive imputationschusetts citizen in the public service, the same document, after a succession of flings and sneers, makes a kindred assault on me; and this is signed by one who so constantly called me friend, and asked me for help. The Senator from Missouri (Mr. Schurz) has already directed attention to this assault, and has expressed his judgment upon it, confessing that he should not have failed to feel the in suit, and then exclaiming with just indignation, when such things are launched against any member
alleged for the removal by the Senate of Mr. Sumner from the position he had for many years filled with such consummate ability, as Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, was, that he was not upon friendly social terms with the President and the Department of State. He prepared, at the time, a careful statement showing why the cordiality of those relations had been disturbed; and it was known that he intended to deliver that speech in the Senate. But his friends Mr. Trumbull and Carl Schurz, to whom his intention was made known, dissuaded him from his purpose, by appealing to his generous nature; and to this appeal he yielded. During three years he refrained from delivering it, suffering in silence the most offensive imputations from those who were unable to appreciate his loyal support, or his disinterested opposition. These words I have quoted from the New York Tribune of this—Monday morning, April 6, 1874—in which the editor says: In the opinion of his friends, t
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