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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 74 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 8 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 8 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 8 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac. You can also browse the collection for Schurz or search for Schurz in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 8 (search)
ute of retreat of these troops, and that of some artillery caissons that were at the same time galloped off the ground, was down the road on which the entire balance of the corps was posted; so that the confused mass overran the next division: Schurz's division. to the left, which was compelled to give way before the enemy even reached its position. Schimmelfennig's brigade, of Schurz's division, made a rapid change of front to the west, and resisted the advance of the enemy for an hour orSchurz's division, made a rapid change of front to the west, and resisted the advance of the enemy for an hour or upwards. Bushbeck, holding with his brigade the extreme left of the Eleventh Corps, made a good fight, and only retired after both his flanks were turned, and then in good order. The rout of the Eleventh Corps was bad enough without the exaggerated coloring in which it has been painted. Much was said in the newspaper accounts of the time regarding the cowardly Dutchmen, and the fact that this corps was supposed to be made up of German elements was emphasized as lending additional opprobrium
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 9 (search)
ck the Eleventh Corps came up—General Howard having arrived some time before and by virtue of his rank assumed command of the field. General Howard left a division Steinwehr's division. in reserve on Cemetery Hill, and placed the divisions of Schurz This division was, for the time being, under General Schimmelpfenig, Schurz commanding the corp. and Barlow to the right of the First Corps, on a prolongation of its general line, and covering the approaches to Gettysburg from the north and noSchurz commanding the corp. and Barlow to the right of the First Corps, on a prolongation of its general line, and covering the approaches to Gettysburg from the north and northwest. Almost simultaneously with the forming of the Eleventh Corps, a fresh division of Ewell's corps, under General Early, arrived from the direction of York and took position on Barlow's front. It has been seen how, by fresh arrivals, the Union line was gradually extended, till now it made a wide curve of several miles around the west and north of the town. In this disposition of his troops General Howard fell into an error that has been common throughout the war—the error of attemptin