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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 12: (search)
to Grant in Congress Hostility of Sumner and Schurz the credit Mobilier scandal entertainment of the Senate, together with those of the Sumner-Schurz coterie, has never been equalled in fervor anis wonderful mental and physical vigor. Carl Schurz supported Mr. Sumner in his attacks upon Pr for Senator Conkling in this line of debate. Schurz had dubbed Senator Conkling The Powter Pigeon n Mephistopheles which had been conferred upon Schurz in virtue of his peculiar physiognomy. It is needless to add that Carl Schurz was not re-elected to the Senate from Missouri, but he was subsequtation in Mrs. Hayes's temperance dinners. Mrs. Schurz and her daughters were among the most charm any position they might undertake to fill. Mr. Schurz wrote in his Memoirs a voluminous history ofan outcome of the savage attacks of Sumner and Schurz on General Grant and the leaders of the regulaas the Vice-President. How Mr. Greeley and Carl Schurz and men of their great ability could have b[1 more...]
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 15: (search)
ersational powers. She had three very interesting daughters, and their Wednesday receptions in their own home were the most agreeable of any of the cabinet on account of the genuine cordiality and hospitality they extended to all callers. Mrs. Carl Schurz, wife of the Secretary of the Interior, was one of the most delightful women ever in Washington. She was very stately and highly cultivated. Mrs. Schurz had a keen appreciation of her position and was always beautifully dressed, but sometiMrs. Schurz had a keen appreciation of her position and was always beautifully dressed, but sometimes greatly disturbed by the lack of dignity on the part of the ladies invited to assist in receptions and the rudeness of some of the callers. Attorney-General Charles A. Devens was one of the most distinguished men ever in the cabinet. He was a bachelor and was from Boston, Massachusetts, a man of rare ability and culture. The agricultural bureau was in those days a branch of the Interior Department, and thus was not of the cabinet as to-day. As usual, New Year's Day was the beginning
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
home of the President of the United States. The list of women prominent in society during this administration, all of whom were frequent visitors at the White House, was a long one. Among others there were Mrs. Hazen, wife of General Hazen, now Mrs. George Dewey, Mrs. John B. Henderson, wife of ex-Senator Henderson of Missouri, one of the most remarkable women of her time, Miss Taylor, Mrs. Beale, wife of General Beale, Mrs. Hill, wife of Senator Hill of Colorado, Miss Edith Harlan, Miss Schurz, Mrs. Schofield, wife of General Schofield, Mrs. Lord, Mrs. Shellabarger, wife of Judge Shellabarger, Mrs. Waite, wife of Chief Justice Waite, and Miss Waite, Mrs. Don Cameron, Mrs. Dahlgren, Mrs. and Miss Blaine, Mrs. Jewett, Mrs. John Davis, Olivia Briggs, Mary Clemmer Ames, the daughters of Senator Frelinghuysen, Mrs. Vinnie Ream Hoxie, and many of the wives of high officials, who were women of decided ability and rare accomplishments. Under President Arthur foreign relations were