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communicates the following particulars of a horrible tragedy recently enacted in the neighborhood of that place: A most terrible and heartrending tragedy occurred about three miles from this place last evening, on the Billoe's mill road. Edward Scott, a school teacher, who had married the widow. Tilford, daughter-in-law of the late Major. Tilford, of Dexington, came into his house where the family were sitting, and without known cause, provocation of warning, fired a pistol at young Jameg him instantly, and then shot Miss Tilford, aged about eighteen, wounding her so that she will certainly die during the night. He then shot a younger Miss Tilford, inflicting a wound in the arm. The other children then fled and hid themselves. Scott pursued them, but they eluded his search and were saved. They were all his step-children:--The attack upon the family was premeditated, for he was well armed with revolvers, two double-barreled shot guns, a United States musket, a hatchet, and b
ay--$50 reward --From the subscriber, a Negro Boy named Bob. Said Negro is about 25 years old; dark complexion about 5 feet 8 or 11 inches high; weighs about 150 lbs. I believe this Negro is trading in some regiment near Manassas, or lurking about Fredericksburg, Charlottesville, or Winchester; and I will pay the above reward for his apprehension and delivery into any of the city jails, so that I can get him. D. B, Scott, Co. G. 4th Als. Reg't. or ja 14--12t J. C. Scott. Marion, Als. ay--$50 reward --From the subscriber, a Negro Boy named Bob. Said Negro is about 25 years old; dark complexion about 5 feet 8 or 11 inches high; weighs about 150 lbs. I believe this Negro is trading in some regiment near Manassas, or lurking about Fredericksburg, Charlottesville, or Winchester; and I will pay the above reward for his apprehension and delivery into any of the city jails, so that I can get him. D. B, Scott, Co. G. 4th Als. Reg't. or ja 14--12t J. C. Scott. Marion, Als.
Gen. Lee. The appointment of Gen. Lee Commander-in-Chief is one which we hail with great satisfaction. In the old army he was justly regarded as second only to Gen. Scott, and we believe that was the opinion of the Lieutenant General himself. As an engineer officer, he has confessedly no superior, and in every respect, we are inclined to think, is the best selection that could have been made. The same objection that was made to Gen. Washington has been alleged against Gen. Lee--too much caution; but it proved an advantage in the first Revolution, and may be equally so in the second. The most cautions General in the Federal ranks in Buell, and he has been the most sucessful. Gen. Lee is a man of great modesty of character, but extraordinary energy, courage, and self-possession. In the early organization of our defences in. Virginia, he scarcely gave sleep to his eyes; yet so noiselessly and mostanatiously were his duties discharged, that do one knew, except by their results,
extent of our discomfiture there. Pillow is a vam man, but a brave and patiotic one. He is a man of talents and indomitable perseverance, and is entitled to some especial consideration on the score of the trouble and disquietude he gave General Scott immediately after the Mexican war. He annoyed the hero of Lundy's Lane so much that he is said to have forgotten his wounds and failed to call attention to them for four whole weeks ! In the prolonged court-martial which he forced upon the Lieutenant-General, he got the better of him all the time, and left him at the close not as much of consolation for the tribulation he had endured as may be contained in a grain of mustard seed. Scott has more vanity than Pillow, (1) but also more sensitiveness. So Pillow, who is very smart, established a raw upon the towering General that gave him more pain than all his other wounds combined. Everybody hopes that men who have really deserved so much of their country may be assigned, at th
Hustings Couri. --This tribunal adjourned for the term on Saturday. The Court certified that John E. Brook was necessary to the security of the jast prisoners, and requested the Governor to release him. C. W. Ellis and Wm. H. Selden, indicted for misdemeanor, gave bail for their appearance at the next term of the Court. Edward Scott, free negro, was bound out to Wm. Miller, to learn the baker's trade. A capias was awarded against M. Mattok, for failing to appear for trial for misdemeanor, according to his recognizance. Attachments were issued against Commonwealth's witnesses in the same case.
The Daily Dispatch: August 13, 1862., [Electronic resource], The fight at Southwest mountain further particulars. (search)
esult by giving the boy a dangerous wound in the hip. The evidence presenting a clear case of moral depravity on the part of the prisoner, and a want of sufficient knowledge of meum et tuum, he was sent to jail to be examined before the Hustings Court for felony. --James Brown, in a fit of abstraction, took possession of J. M. Bowlin's wagon, and the latter, as soon as he was in the enjoyment of a "realizing sense" of what had transpired, caused the officers to seek out Brown. The latter offering no clear and satisfactory excuse for his eccentric conduct, was deemed a fit subject for examination before the Aldermen's Court of Hustings. The value of the wagon was set down at $65.--Charles, slave of R. J. Jones. Edward Scott, and Fleming Mitchell, free, were each ordered a little of what "Paddy gave the drum" for stealing fruit from the garden of Roger Martin. --Marletta Donegro. John Evans, Jose Marle, B. Baccine, Smith Wallett, and Levi Benedict, were each fined for huckstering.
Alabama regiments is erroneous.--Some fifty men of each of the two regiments were made prisoners, but were subsequently retaken by our troops. Depredations of the raiders. The Petersburg Express, of yesterday, has the following information of the thieving and plundering of Wilson's gang in the counties of Dinwiddie, Nottoway, and Lanenburg: From Mr. Robert Sydnor, an estimable citizen of Dinwiddie, they stole forty gallons of wine and twenty-five barrels of corn. From Mr. Edward Scott and brothers they stole some forty of fifty negroes. At Ford's Depot they arrested Mr. Pegram, the Railroad Agent, and confined him in a hog pen. Mr. Pegram had given his watch and $1,800 to a servant for safe keeping, but it is stated that the negro proved recreant to his trust, and went off with the raiders, carrying the watch and money with him. From Mr. Freeman Eppes, of Nottoway, they stole twenty-seven likely negroes. From Thomas H. Campbell, Esq., they stole all hi