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The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 23 1 Browse Search
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Opinion of an enemy. --Michael Corcoran; late commander of the famous New York 69th Regiment, (now a resident of this city,) is reported on the authority of a correspondent of a Southern paper, to have said in reference to the battle of Manassas Plains, on the 21st of July: "That the rapid concentration of troops against our left swelled the attacking force to 37,000 or 38,000 men by eleven o'clock, and at one P. M., McDowell and Scott felt confident of victory; that this huge army consisted of the flower of the Federal army, and if every Southern soldier had not been a hero, a dreadful defeat would have been given us. That their loss must be appalling; that the blow will so effectually disorganize their army, which was dissatisfied and shattered before, that they cannot, if they would, again assume the offensive; that Beauregard and Johnston are among the first commanders of the age, and their army, whilst fighting in the defence, must always prove invincible." While thos
Elopement. --On the 8th of July, Mrs, Emma Amelia Scott, the wife of a rich merchant in New York city, eloped with a Mr. Newton St. John, one of the fast young men that abound in that metropolis. The relations of the lady were almost frantic at her sudden disappearance, and two New York detectives were sent in her pursuit. They arrived in St. Louis a few days since, and left the miniatures of the runaway couple with the Chief of Police of St. Louis, who had them arrested. Previous to stnce, and left the miniatures of the runaway couple with the Chief of Police of St. Louis, who had them arrested. Previous to starting on their journey, Mrs. Scott drew $300 from the Bank, and also took with her $1,500 worth of jewelry. When arrested she stated that it was useless to take her back to New York, and the home of her husband, as, added to the shame of facing those she had injured. She loved the man with whom she had fled, and was determined to live with him.--Louisville Courier.
An Incident of the war. --Capt. W. N. Nelson, of the Valley, who was seriously wounded in the battle of Manassas, is a son of Maj. T. M. Nelson, Scott's old companion in arms, who received a sword from Virginia on the same day with himself and Harvey Brown. Capt. Nelson was shot by Scott's Regulars, with sixteen of his men, on the left wing, In the glorious battle. Four were shot in the left breast. An Incident of the war. --Capt. W. N. Nelson, of the Valley, who was seriously wounded in the battle of Manassas, is a son of Maj. T. M. Nelson, Scott's old companion in arms, who received a sword from Virginia on the same day with himself and Harvey Brown. Capt. Nelson was shot by Scott's Regulars, with sixteen of his men, on the left wing, In the glorious battle. Four were shot in the left breast.
Scott's grand Rented expedition. Its character, Objects and plans. The army correspondent of the New Orleans Picayune, writing from Maurly throwing new and important light upon the late expedition of Gen. Scott, even upon his inmost plans and thoughts. It is now clear that tl and every resource exhausted. For several days previous to Gen. Scott's advance, we had observed great activity on the Potomac. Gen. Bistract our attention, annoy us, and finally to co-operate with General Scott on the Manassas Plains. This explains all his advances and retd engage him.--He knew that his ultimate object was to unite with Gen. Scott before Alexandria. He therefore deliberately tell back to Winchend scheme was to be carried into effect. It is probable that Gen. Scott saw at last that Gens. Beauregard and Johnston had found out his auregard here, and so far as possible to play into the hands of General Scott here. The Federalists certainly cannot have expected to make h