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g the entire action. Our list of killed and wounded is as follows, namely: First Missouri.--Lieut. Burrows, Ausco Clark, John A. Brown, and James Conia, of Company L; John F. Dumont, Wm. Myers, Thomas W. George, Geo. W. Mitchell, John Hersing, and John McGeary, of Company I. Fourth Ohio.--Capt. Foster, Lieut. Kinger, Benj. F. Dugan, and Samuel Koffman. Merrill's Horse.--Alexander Keath, Henry Redding, and Thos. Moore, of Company E, and Jacob King, of Company D, First Iowa.--James Scott, Thos. C. Fletcher, and James Caran of Company A; James Convey, and Stephen Sexton of Company F; Cornelius Thompson, and Andrew Johnson, of Company I. The loss of the enemy cannot be acurately ascertained, but from the most reliable information, their loss in killed and wounded cannot be less than eighty to one hundred. Your most obedient, W. M. G. Torrence, Major First Battalion First Iowa Cavalry. To Brig.-Gen. Pope, Otterville, Mo. Missouri Democrat account. Fayette, H
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
y evening we would gather around the wounded and sing and pray with them. Many wounded, who had hitherto led wicked lives, became entirely changed, and by their vows and determinations evinced their purpose to devote themselves to God. Most of those who died in a conscious state gave gratifying and satisfactory testimony of the efficacy of the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ in a dying hour. I witnessed some triumphant deaths—prayer and praise from dying lips. One young Tennesseean, James Scott, of the Thirty-second Tennessee, I think, attracted the attention of all. He continually begged us to sing for him and to pray with him. He earnestly desired to see his mother before he died, which was not permitted, as she was in the enemy's lines, and he died rejoicing in the grace of God. We will long remember Jimmie Scott. An attractive countenance, pleasing manners, he endured his intense suffering with great fortitude; not a murmur or complaint was heard from him, and his strong r
evening we would gather around the wounded and sing and pray with them. Many wounded, who had hitherto led wicked lives, became entirely changed, and by their vows and determinations evinced their purpose to devote themselves to God. Most of those who died in a conscious state gave gratifying and satisfactory testimony of the efficacy, of the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ in a dying hour. I witnessed some triumphant deaths-prayer and praise from dying lips. One young Tennesseean, James Scott, of the 32d Tennessee, I think, attracted the attention of all. He continually begged us to sing for him and to pray with him. He earnestly desired to see his mother before he died, which was not permitted, as she was in the enemy's lines, and he died rejoicing in the grace of God. We will long remember Jimmie Scott. An attractive countenance, pleasing manners, he endured his intense sufferings with great fortitude; not a murmur or complaint was heard from him, and his strong religious
e Norcum. While Major Maurin was detached in command of artillery at High Bridge, Major Miller took his place with Richardson's battalion. On duty with the command of General Wise, along the railroad in southwest Virginia, was Coppens' battalion, now known as the Confederate States Zouaves, under Maj Fulgence Bordenave. On the last day of 1864, General York's command, returned from the valley, was reported in the charge of Col. W. R. Peck—the First and Fourteenth regiments under Capt. James Scott; Second, Capt. W. H. Noel; Fifth, Sixth and Seventh, Capt. John A. Russell; Eighth, Lieut. N. J. Sandlin; Ninth, Capt. Cornelius Shively; Tenth and Fifteenth, Lieut. J. B. W. Penrose. On January 19th and 20th the Washington artillery was put in position at Batteries 34 to 38. Petersburg will be forever associated with the last act of the tragedy. Life in the faithful city under that tremendous clamor of hundreds of guns loses its sense of security. As the din goes on from day to
Virginia Post-Offices. --A new office is established at Grove Landing, James City county, and William B. Wynne appointed postmaster. Office at Callahan's, Alleghany county, is re-established, and Wm. Weller appointed postmaster. Appointments.--James Cowling, postmaster at Broad Run Station, Fauquier county, vice Samuel P. Bagley, resigned. Abraham Rathbone, postmaster at Burning Spring, Wirt county, vice John V. Rathbone, resigned. John F. Bennett, postmaster at Burnville, Brumwell county, vice Jas. W. Connelly, resigned. Jas. Scott, postmaster at Middle Mountain, Craig county, vice John Scott deceased.
The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1861., [Electronic resource], The surrender of the Government property in Texas. (search)
f they leave it, they are here without a dollar, and they do not know what penalties might follow them. They are men capable of reading, of good thinking faculties, in receipt of the newspapers, and they would be a remarkable class if they could keep from forming conclusions as to the present crisis. Many of them are Southern men, others are favorable to the South, and but few of them are attached to the North. It is impossible to make such men machines for carrying out the follies of old Scott. The garrison has been expecting to receive marching orders by every steamer, but, as yet, nothing has been done. I suppose that the Government does not intend to call the troops away from here, for this force would be ineffective elsewhere to accomplish any great purpose; and if the United States Government intends to use force, it would be the most sensible idea to have these troops here, where coercion will be as necessary as elsewhere, and proceed at once to call out the militia.
limit the right to make an entry or bring an action to recover land or the possession thereof, west of the Allegheny mountains, was made the order of the day for Monday next. Bills Passed.--House bill refunding to Matthew Walmsley, Jr., of the county of Randolph, a certain amount of money erroneously paid by him; House bill for the relief of Rev. J. Packard: House bill granting the Commonwealth's right to real estate of John Kelly, deceased, to Owen Shea; House bill for the relief of James Scott, of Greenbrier county; House bill refunding a license tax to Paul A. Farley, of the county of Lunenburg; House bill refunding to the securities of Wm. H. Blanche, late Sheriff of the county of Mecklenburg, certain damages paid by them; Senate bill for the relief of Daniel S. Dickinson; House bill to amend the charter of the Banks of Scottsville; Senate bill establishing a branch Bank at the town of Jeffersonville, in the county of Tazewell; House bill to incorporate the Capper Springs Com
The standing Army on the twenty-second. The Washington correspondent of the New York Tribune,gives a most magniloquent account of the parade of Gen.Scott's mercenaries in Washington, and makes more fuss over the "great captain of the age," and his thousand men, than Parisians do over a review of sixty thousand French soldiers, under the leadership of the Duke of Malakoff, Marshall McMahon, and other such small military potatoes. We call attention, however, to the following paragraph, to show what it is that gives such exquisite zest to the military demonstrations in Washington — to the firing of cannon "pointed straight at Virginia's sacred shore --what would she say if their brazen throats were to vomit unbroken streams of grape in her venerable face?" "As the firing was going on near the Treasury, the lithe form of Pryor, and the dapper dimensions of Garnett, the two favorite grandsons of Virginia, were dimly seen flitting about in the cloud of smoke that rolled over the
Messrs. Griffin, Talbott and Wynne. Fire Department--Messrs. Scott, Denoon, Haskins, Greanor and Burr. Disputed Elections--Messrs. Burr, Glazebrook, Epps and Talbott. Gas Works Committee — Jefferson Ward--Messrs. N. B. Hill and James M. Talbott. Madison Ward--Messrs. Thomas H. Wynne and George K. Crutchfield. Monroe Ward--Messrs. Larkin W. Glazebrook and Thos. C. Epps. Water Works Committee--Jefferson Ward--Messrs. John H. Greanor and Allen Y. Stokes. Madison Ward — James Scott and George K. Crutchfield. Monroe Ward — Samuel D. Denoon and Fleming Griffin. The President read a communication from the Inspectors of Seabrook's Warehouse, with a copy of a notice from the Auditor of Public Accounts, ordering them to retain part of the rent due to the city, for the use of the State, until the city makes the roofs of Seabrook's fire-proof. The President said he had ordered the work to be done, so as to retain the amount ordered to be withheld. A certificate <
thdrawing from the files of the last session of the House of Delegates, Senate bill No. 204, and referring the same to the Committee on Finance; by Mr. Booker, of dividing the State into twelve divisions, and that the brigades composing the old divisions be so rearranged as to conform to the new divisions; by Mr. Robertson, of incorporating the Home Savings Bank of Richmond; by Mr. Magruder, of amending the act incorporating the Jefferson Insurance Company; by Mr. Matthews, of refunding to Jas. Scott, of Greenbrier county, a sum of money improperly assessed on account of delinquent land tax; by Mr. Morris, of leave to withdraw from the files of this House bill No. 386, and referring the same to the Committee of Propositions and Grievances; by Mr. Hunt, of withdrawing from the files of the House of Delegates Senate bill of last session for the relief of Hiram Brower; by Mr. Christian, of authorizing the Auditor of Public Accounts to pay the amount of a claim of J. A. Waddell, for advert
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