Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Scott or search for John Scott in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
ed by the greatest humanity and leniency consistent with public obligation. Some have been permitted to return home on parole, others to remain at large under similar conditions, within this Confederacy, and all have been furnished with rations for their subsistence, such as are allowed to our own troops. This letter was sent to Washington by special messenger (Colonel Taylor); but he was refused an audience with Mr. Lincoln, and was forced to content himself with a verbal reply from General Scott to the effect that the letter had been delivered to Mr. Lincoln, and that he would reply to it in writing as soon as possible. But no answer ever came. For nearly a year after the war began, although many prisoners were captured and released on parole, on both sides, the Federal authorities refused to enter into any arrangement for the exchange of prisoners, taking the absurd position that they would not treat with rebels in any way which would recognize them as belligerents. The En
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
the enemy became a watchword for danger and a signal for action. The Black Horse was organized at Warrenton in 1859, just two years before the war cloud broke over the land, and first figured at Harper's Ferry in the John Brown raid. Colonel John Scott, of Fauquier, was its first captain, and gave the troop its name. Colonel Scott, who had retired from active life, was for a generation a conspicuous figure in that section of the State as Commonwealth's Attorney, and is known as the authoColonel Scott, who had retired from active life, was for a generation a conspicuous figure in that section of the State as Commonwealth's Attorney, and is known as the author of The Lost Principle and a Life of Mosby. On the 16th of May, 86, at the Fauquier White Sulphur Springs, reorganization was affected with requisitions from the Warrenton Rifles and the Powhatan Guards, of Southwestern Virginia. The following officers were sworn in: William H. Payne, Captain; Robert Randolph, A. D. Payne, Charles H. Gordon, James H. Childs, Robert Mitchell, and Richard Lewis, Lieutenants; Willington Millon, Madison C. Tyler, George H. Shumate, and N. A. Clopton, Cor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign and battle of Lynchburg. (search)
d inscription to their courage on the Lion of Lucerne. A like love was the foundation of the wonderful heroism of the Highlanders at Lucknow and of the Scotch who climbed the Heights of Abraham at Quebec. So it was their love for the historic memories of Virginia which nerved the courage of that dauntless division which, under a fire never before poured on line of battle, reached the brow of the hill at Gettysburg. By gathering the traditions of the Highlands and thus perpetuating them, Scott has done a great work for Scotland. Others have done the same thing for England. It is for this generation to gather the same wealth for Virginia. Thus will the history of her people, of her valleys, her rivers and her mountains be preserved, and the facts be secured to generations yet to come, which, when mellowed by time, will be perpetuated in story, in poetry and in song. Thus, and thus only, can we keep Virginia and her people on the elevated plane upon which they have stood for c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
thorities, for it was known there by some one who reported the fact that he had left West Point to join the Confederate army. He was placed under surveillance and not allowed to cross the river to Louisville. However, he accepted the first opportunity to elude the authorities and went up to Jeffersonville. Around his stay at Jeffersonville and subsequent escape there is woven a pretty little romance, which, whether true or not, is worth relating. He had disguised himself as one of General Scott's couriers, so the story goes, before entering the town, and while watching his chance to slip across the river, he became acquainted with a pretty Yankee maiden, who was visiting friends in the place. She became smitten with the handsome young soldier, and they were together much. By and by he gained her confidence sufficiently to disclose his identity without fear of betrayal, and informed her of his purpose to go South and join the Confederate army. She was a true Northern girl,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
ourage no less than that the Confederate soldier displayed upon the field. There is no stain upon the faith we plighted when the hard tutelage of reconstruction was ended and we renewed allegiance to the United States Government. Our representatives are in Congress, striving with fidelity to legislate for the good of the whole country. Once and again in recent years our sons have answered the drum beat of the Union and rallied to the flag which Washington made illustrious at Yorktown, and Scott at Lundy's Lane, and Davis at Buena Vista, and Lee at Chapultepec. And but now, in supremest evidence that we hold the new bond of union to be one of fellowship, Virginia has tendered, for a place in the capital at Washington, a statue of her best beloved son, the flower of Southern chivalry, the lion of the Confederacy—Robert Lee. Ah, little they knew us who deem that we would offer up his noble effigy as the pledge of a half-hearted allegiance! And as little those who think that we wo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
-79, 230; Fatality among, in Northern prisons, 100. Ramseur, General S. D., 105, killed, 372. Randall. James R., 338. Randolph, Colonel, Robert, 146. Rebels and Rebellions, 3, 7. Reed, W. P., 117. Reynolds, General J. F., 148. Richmond, First Federal to enter, 152. Rogers, Major, wounded, 114. Rhodes, James F., 19. Rodes, General R. E., 111. Sadler, D. M., 174. Sanitary Commission, Federal, 81. Sassacus destroyed. The, 213. Schofield, General J. M., 97. Scott, Colonel, John, 142; General Winfield, 20. Secession, discussed, 13. 334, 362; of Southern States, 17; prime instigators of, 19. Seven Days Battles, Reminiscences of, 147. Shelby, General, Joe, 117. Sherman, General W. T., 21; his definition of war, 235. Sickles, General D. E., 112. Silver Grays, Service of, 309. Slavery in the South, 15, 77; old system of contrasted with present conditions, 125. Slavers, Last of the. Voyage of the Wanderer, 355. Slaves, trade in, by whom instit