hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 20 results in 5 document sections:

Southern wood. Carolina is the driver, With Georgia by her side; Virginia holds the flag up, While we all take a ride. chorus — Wait for the wagon, &c. The invading tribe called Yankees, With Lincoln for their guide, Tried to keep Kentucky From joining in the ride; But she heeded not their entreaties-- She has come into the ring; She wouldn't fight for a Government Where Cotton wasn't king. chorus — So wait for the wagon, &c. Old Lincoln and his Congressmen, With Seward by his side, Put old Scott in the wagon, Just for to take a ride. McDowell was the driver; To cross Bull Run he tried, But there he left the wagon, For Beauregard to ride. chorus — Wait for the wagon, &c. Manassas was the battle-ground; The field was fair and wide; The Yankees thought they'd whip us out, And on to Richmond ride; But when they met our “Dixie” boys, Their danger they espied; They wheeled about for Washington, And didn't wait to ride. chorus — So wait for the wagon, &c. Brave Beauregard-God bless hi
said Old Nick, with a grin; “I have only stepped in To renew old acquaintance with your honor ag'in. How are Seward, and Scott, and good Mrs. L.? I hope all your friends are still hearty and well.” Thus saying, he seated himself in a chair, And gazthem your grounds of political creed; I gave you my subjects — the best I have got, Such as Cameron, and Seward, and Old Granny Scott; Assisted by Greeley, and Bennett, and Weed, As miserable scoundrels as Tophet could breed, To fix up a plan for p, and reaping the chaff.” “What say you to this?” cried Old Nick, waxing hot. Quoth President Lincoln, “You must ask General Scott.” “Old Scott's an old ass, and Seward to boot; And as for yourself, you're a pitiful brute, Too mean to let live, anins to hell;-- I have finished my mission. Farewell-farewell! “ Thus saying, he left in a moment of time, And wound up his speech, where I wind up my rhyme; He left General Scott in a passion and worry-- Old Abe in a fit, and hi
By pressure, not by slaughter.--General McClellan, so writes a Washington correspondent, is using untiring industry in getting the army into the best possible condition, while it is more evident, every day, that he does not mean to use it to obtain military glory, but to carry out a plan similar to that of Scott--to quell this rebellion by a mighty pressure, and not by a mighty slaughter.
Munchauseniana. Richmond, Nov. 4.--It is here currently reported that considerable commotion exists in Washington and in the free States from the rumored resignations of Generals Scott and McClellan, and of Secretaries Seward and Cameron, and of other prominent Federal officials. A general Kilkenny cat fight seems impending throughout Lincolndom. A special despatch to the Richmond Dispatch, dated Manassas to-day, announces that reliable information from Washington says there are but fifre forced to close their stores. There are said to be no more than eighty thousand men in and around Washington. A gentleman just arrived from Manassas says that the Baltimore Sun of Saturday reports the resignation of Seward, Blair, Cameron, Scott, and McClellan. The probable difficulty grew out of the attempt to force McClellan to attack the Confederate forces.--Charleston Mercury, Nov. 5. A note from J. L. Shumate, of New Madrid, Mo., says that after the evacuation of Fredericktown b
s you most promptly agreed, And made them your grounds of political creed, I gave you my subjects — the best I have got, Such as Cameron, and Seward, and "Old Granny Scott;" Assisted by Greeley, and Bennett, and Weed, As miserable scoundrels as Tophet could breed, To fix up a plan for "preserving the Union," In the bonds of the head of a calf, It is sowing the whirlwind and rasping the chaff, "What say you to this?" cried Old Nick, waving hot; Quoth President Dinesin, "You must ask Gen. Scott" "Old Scott's an old and Seward to boot;" And at for yourself, you're a pitiful brute, Too mean to let live, and too worthless to shoot. "But, to come t on the sand' the bleak tempest shall fail, And sweep you away in its ruins to hell-- "I have finished my mission, farewell ! Farewell !" Thus saying, he left in a moment of time, And wound up his speech, where I wind up my rhyme; He left General Scott in a passion any worry-- Old Abe in a fit, and his wife in a flurry.