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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
m, and that is the only preparation for defense I have seen. We are told that the city is to be defended, but if that is so, the Lord only knows where the men are to come from. The general opinion seems to be that it is to be evacuated, and every preparation seems to be going forward to that end. All the horses that could be found have been pressed for the removal of government stores, and we had great difficulty in getting our baggage from the depot to the hotel. Mr. Legriel's nephew, Robert Scott, was at the train to take us out to Lily's, but Fred thought it best for us to stay at the hotel, as he wants to leave in the morning by the first train over the Macon & Western. Mulberry Street, in front of the Lanier House, is filled with officers and men rushing to and fro, and everything and everybody seems to be in the wildest excitement. ... In the hotel parlor, when I came from Lily's, whom should I find but Mr. Adams, our little Yankee preacher! I used to like him, but now I hat
heir arms and being perfectly raw recruits. Great praise is due Lieutenant-Colonel J. J. Landrum for his coolness and bravery. The following-named officers of Colonel Metcalfe's regiment acted well and did credit to themselves, to wit: Captain Robert Scott of Harrison, Captain W. W. Bradly of Berry's Station, Captain Benjamin Robins of Falmouth, Captain Sharp of Bath County. Respectfully, W. O. Smith. Surgeon Lair's letter. Cynthiana, Ky., July 22, 1862. Having seen so many from the north, east and south. Our forces were under command of Lieut.-Col. J. J. Landrum and Major William O. Smith, who showed energy and courage. Among those who manifested bravery and determination, were Col. Landrum, Major Smith, Capt. Robert Scott, Capt. W. S. Wilson, and Capt. McClintock. Up to this time we have found twenty-seven Federals dead and nineteen rebels. The next day succeeding the battle, Morgan, with his band of yelling hounds, left this place, bound southward to
n a sail on the Chesapeake in the month of June. On our way down we passed in view of the Light-House and entrance to Fort Pulaski, and afterward passed the mouth of Warsaw Sound, and learned that Commandant Drayton had left his anchorage there with the Monitor Passaic, and had joined and taken command as senior officer of the whole fleet in Ossabaw Sound, preparatory to a joint attack on Fort McAllister, located a few miles up the Ogeechee River. He had left the gunboat Marblehead, Captain Robert Scott, there, to blockade this outlet from Savannah. We reached the bar off Ossabaw Sound at sunset on Monday evening, and selecting a good anchorage about seven miles from shore, dropped anchor and settled down for the night. We were within sight of the fleet lying in the sound, and Captain Lowber set a signal, according to his instructions, by which they would understand he desired to report to Commandant Drayton. There was scarcely a ripple on the ocean, and we enjoyed our game of w
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Schopf, J. D., 577 Schouler, 322 Schrevelius, 449 Schurman, J. G., 239 Schurz, Carl, 352, 354, 363, 364, 420 586 Schuyler, Eugene, 164 Schwab, J. C., 443 Scidmore, Eliza R., 155, 167 Science and Health, 517 n., 522-32 Science of economic discussion, 441 Science of finance, 442 Science of health, 527 Science of health and happiness, 527 Science of mind, the, 523, 528 Science of political economy, the, 44 Science of wealth, the, 435 Scott, H. W., 327 Scott, Robert, 461 Scott, Sir, Walter, 6, 12, 69, 70, 87, 96, 99, 454, 484, 541, 542, 546 Scraps of California history never before published, 141 Scribe, 550 Scribner, Charles, 310 Scribner's magazine, 73, 158, 301, 310, 312, 316 Scribner's monthly, 38, 48, 301, 310, 311, 312, 314 Scripps, 327 Scrope, Poulett, 434 Scudder, H. E., 307 Seabury, Samuel, 345 Seaman, E. C., 434 Sea power in its relation to the War of 1812, 196 Search for the North Pole, the, 169 Seasons,
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Company E (search)
Aug. 22, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Unof. Edmund E. Rice, Boston, 18, s; tinman. Aug. 20, 1862. Wounded, Cane River. Disch. disa. Feb. 12, 1865. James Riley, North Braintree, 30, m; laborer. Sept. 8, 1862. Disch. disa. Jan. 18, 1864, New Orleans, La. John E. Robbins, Brownington, Vt., Cr. Randolph, 27, m; farmer. March 25, 1864. Disch. disa. June 22, 1865. Unof. Benjamin Roberts, Boston, 40, m; ship carpenter. Aug. 16, 1862. Died June 20, 1863, New Orleans, La. Robert Scott, Stoughton, 40, m; laborer. Aug. 22, 1862. Died Sept. 10, 1863, Baton Rouge, La. Christopher K. Smith, Boston, 19, s; caulker, Aug. 20, 1862. Died July 13, 1863, Baton Rouge, La. Cornelius Sullivan, Salem, 32, m; laborer. Aug. 22, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Unof. James Walker, Boston, 28, s; mariner. Sept. 15, 1862. Deserted, Dec. 3, 1862, Jamaica, L. I. John Welch, 1sT, Salem, 38, m; laborer. June 16, 1862. Disch. May 20, 1865. Unof. John Welch, 2ND, Salem, 21,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
s Haney, Francis L. Hill, Noah Holkman, H. H. Hopkins, R. T. Howard, Isaiah Hunton, Jacob Imboden, Matthew Jennings, C. W. Johnson, M. A. Jones, W. M. Yerby, John C. Rally, Hugh C. Keysear, James P. Kite, Richard Knox, Thomas O. Kite, M. P. Lacy, T. B. Leach, Clifton Lee, J. W. Limbrick, D. W. Lowe, Willis J. Landram, Edward G. Leavell, Fielding Lucas, Wm. L. Manley, Elimonder Myers, O. D. Miller, J. M. Milton, L. E. Meredith, John L. McKenny, William Norris, John J. Porter, John T. Pritchard, James H. Peebles, Geo. H. Priest, Thomas Parr, Rupert R. Powell, H. F. Powell, Jno. R. Paine, Thos. H. Riley, Daniel Reeves, S. B. Rollins, John M. Royston, J. E. Ricketts, T. R. Ridgely, Robert Scott, J. A. Silman, John A. Silman, J. G. Smoot, Jas. W. Strother, John C. Sinclair, B. R. Swann, W. S. Sours, M. V. Scurry, F. Spottswood, E. T. Smith, Alfred Thompson, D. L. Thomas, Alonzo Travis, E. M. Towles, W. R. Taylor, Chas. Vier, A. F. Wirizelle, Jno. W. Wheatley, Chas. P. Walker, Chas. Worsam.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
oyal, Va. Immediately on hearing of this, having a lot of thirty prisoners on hand, I made them draw lots for seven to be hanged as a measure of retaliation to protect my men. These men were hanged on the Valley pike, along where Sheridan's troops traveled every day, as a warning of what they might expect if any more of my men were hanged. At the same time I wrote a letter to General Sheridan (which was published in the newspapers at the time, and can be found in the memoir of my command by Scott), avowing my responsibility for the act, and stating my reasons for it. Sheridan acknowledged the justness of the deed by ordering my men to be treated with the humanities of war. I have never been called in question for this act although I assumed all responsibility for it. It will be observed in this letter I justify what I did and make no allusion to the instructions of General Lee—or the Confederate Secretary of War, Mr. Seddon. They were both then living, but I would not take refug
The Daily Dispatch: November 29, 1861., [Electronic resource], Proceedings of the Methodist Annual Conference. (search)
rs of this Conference who have died during the past year. The report was adopted. The Rev. W. B. Rowzie, when his name was called, gave a brief account of his transactions as agent for Wesleyan Female College. Early in the year the troubles of the times made it evident that nothing could be done, and he, at the instance of the Presiding Elder of the district, took charge of Greensville circuit, and remained there until the close of the year. Rev. Minton Thrift, G. W. Charlton, Robert Scott, E. Chambers, (who was located,) were severally called, and except as indicated, continued upon the superannuated list. Preaching at night was announced by Dr. Sehon, at Cumberland Street, and John C. Granberry, at Granby Street Church. And then the Conference adjourned. Pursuant to adjournment, the Conference met at 3¼ o'clock, Bishop Andrew in the chair. Prayer by Rev. J. D. Couling. The Bishop apologized for arriving five minutes too late, on the ground that th
City Council. --A called meeting of this body was to have been held at 4 o'clock yesterday, but when that hour arrived only four members appeared in their seats viz: Messrs. Saunders, Hill, Scott, and Denoon. We learned that all member of the committee to collect money to buy shoes, &c., for the soldiers, had on a visit to Messrs. Kent, Paine & Co.'s establishment, found out that the city had there for sale 250 soldiers' overcoats. Thereupon the President of the Council was applied to give them to the collecting committee as a donation from the city. This, he replied, he had no authority to do, but he would stop the sale of the articles until he could call the Council together and learn their wishes in regard to the matter. The meeting was called for yesterday evening, with the result above stated. Judging from what passed yesterday, we suppose the Council may signify its willingness to dispose of the coats at prime cost to the committee, retaining a sufficient number to su