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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
her with the few extremists who were openly in favor of coercion. Of this class the most prominent were the late Judge T. Parkin Scott, then prominent at the bar, and William Byrne, the famous politician and gambler. Byrne was the recognized head man of good address and strong sense, kind and liberal, he carried with him a large clientele of adventurous spirits. Mr. Scott represented the soberer, but not less aggressive, wing of the extremist faction. One of the most curious features o a meeting of the military organization known as the Maryland National Volunteers was held under the presidency of Mr. T. Parkin Scott, and inflammatory speeches were made. At two o'clock two trains, containing twenty-one cars, which had left Harriby the Mayor, as follows: Washington, April 20th, 1861. To Mayor Brown, Baltimore: We have seen the President and General Scott. We have from the former a letter to the Mayor and Governor, declaring that no troops shall be brought through Balti
was held at evening in Monument Square — T. Parkin Scott presiding; he, with Wilson C. N. Carr andn, Baltimore: We have seen the President and Gen. Scott. We bear from the former a letter to the Mah the President, attended by the Cabinet and Gen. Scott. Mr. Lincoln urged, with abundant reason, thal to armed treason. He finally appealed to Gen. Scott, who gave his military opinion that troops mispatch was submitted; and the President and Gen. Scott agreed that the Pennsylvania soldiers, who hr people can take it — they will take it — and Scott, the arch-traitor, and Lincoln, the Beast, comro States still more rapidly than he came; and Scott, the traitor, will be given the opportunity, at the same time, to try the difference between Scott's Tactics and the Shanghae Drill for quick movg sink of iniquity, that wallow of Lincoln and Scott — the desecrated city of Washington; and many to the small force of regulars commanded by Gen. Scott, had constituted, up to this time, the enti
D. 102; speech at the Union meeting, New York, April 20, Doc. 93; official report of the ambuscade at Vienna, Va., Doc. 405 Schenectady, N. Y., D. 10; Union meeting at, D. 35 Schwarzwaelder, —, Colonel 5th Regt., N. Y. S. M., Doc. 163 Scotland, union with England, Int. 16 Scott Life Guard, First Regiment of, left New York, D. 92; notice of, Doc. 337 Scott and the Veteran, a poem, P. 102 Scott, Robert S., offered a place in Lincoln's Cabinet, P. 9 Scott, T. Parkin, D. 29 Scott, Winfield, General, notices of, D. 9, 14, 22; preparing to meet secessionists in Washington, D. 10; rumored resignation of, D. 33; his telegraph to Senator Crittenden, D. 37; notices of, D. 38; P. 71; congratulatory letter to, D. 52; the South does not doubt his loyalty to the United States, D. 53; his residence in New Jersey, D. 84; Southern opinion of, D. 87; general orders for the protection of railroads in Maryland and Pennsylvania, Doc. 78; where he stands, Doc. 12
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
in human history. Early that morning the mayor had gone to Washington on a special train to see the President and General Scott at the invitation of the former to the governor and mayor to visit him for conference as to the best way to preserve Relay House on the Northern Central railroad, seven miles north-west of the city, and thence by rail to Washington. General Scott proposed this plan to the President, if the people of Maryland would permit it and would not molest the troops. But iaid, he would bring troops from Perryville by boat to Annapolis and thence by rail to Washington. The President and General Scott both seemed to take it for granted that the Potomac would be blockaded. Mayor Brown returned from Washington with ths of commerce and trade of a great city. They were John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. Mason Morfit, S. Teakle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. Harrison, and Lawrence Langston. It was evident in
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: Maryland's overthrow. (search)
of the militia, though it was not made until the 10th. But on the 8th Johnson and his company marched to Virginia. At the Point of Rocks he arranged with Capt. James Ashby to ride into Frederick, seize the governor and carry him off to Virginia and thus break up the State government and throw it into the hands of the legislature, who would be obliged to take charge during the interregnum. A notice to this effect was sent to the leaders in the legislature and they promptly dispatched T. Parkin Scott, member from Baltimore City, to Johnson, then on the Maryland Heights with the Maryland battalion, demanding that he cease his enterprises and let them alone. He obeyed them and they went to prison; while he went into the field. The battalion at Harper's Ferry was helpless. Company A was the only company that pretended to be armed, and it carried Hall's carbines, which had been procured in Baltimore by its captain. This arm was the original breechloader manufactured at Harper's Fe
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
s in the army bearing his paternal name, he adopted that of his paternal grandmother, Elzey, by which he was subsequently known. As an artillery officer he served with credit during the Seminole outbreak in Florida, and when war was declared between the, United States and Mexico, he was in command of a battery at Brownsville, Tex., where he had the honor of firing the first gun of the war. From this opening gun, until the surrender of the City of Mexico, he was with the armies of Taylor and Scott, participating in nearly every battle, and was twice brevetted for gallant and meritorious conduct on the field. In 1860, with the rank of captain of artillery, he was in command of the United States arsenal at Augusta, Ga., which he surrendered with the honors of war upon the demand of superior forces soon after the fall of Fort Sumter. He then conducted his command to Washington, after which he resigned his commission and made his way to Richmond, where he was commissioned lieutenant-col
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
hington. They telegraphed back that they had seen the President, members of the Cabinet and General Scott, and that orders would be sent to stop the passage of men through the city. Fort McHenry wat 7:30 and arrived in Washington at 10. At the interview with the President the Cabinet and General Scott, were present. The President admitted the excited state of feeling in Baltimore and his desh, which gave the President great surprise. The President summoned the Secretary of War and General Scott, and urged the recall of the troops, saving he had no idea they would be there. Lest there that the troops should, if it were practicable, be sent back at once to York or Harrisburg. General Scott adopted the President's view, and an order was prepared by the Lieutenant-General to that efsince. It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. Harrison, and Lawrence Sangs
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
hington. They telegraphed back that they had seen the President, members of the Cabinet and General Scott, and that orders would be sent to stop the passage of men through the city. Fort McHenry wat 7:30 and arrived in Washington at 10. At the interview with the President the Cabinet and General Scott, were present. The President admitted the excited state of feeling in Baltimore and his desh, which gave the President great surprise. The President summoned the Secretary of War and General Scott, and urged the recall of the troops, saving he had no idea they would be there. Lest there that the troops should, if it were practicable, be sent back at once to York or Harrisburg. General Scott adopted the President's view, and an order was prepared by the Lieutenant-General to that efsince. It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. Harrison, and Lawrence Sangs
l Butler thought fit to disregard what might interfere, by seizing these articles (entered and stowed under the sanction of his own officers) in a foreign ship which was ready to sail eight days previously. A Baltimorean in Fort Lafayette. The New York Freeman's Journal, in speaking of the confinement of political prisoners in Fort Lafayette, thus speaks of a distinguished citizen of Baltimore: Our heart bleeds when we think of that venerable member of the Baltimore bar, T. Parkin Scott. We saw this accomplished gentleman at Fort Lafayette, day after day, sitting down to the bad soldiers' ration — inferior and badly-cooked pork, served on filthy tin plates, accompanied by brown bread and a hot detection of burnt rye and molasses — without milk — called, by way of jest, coffee.--His scant and thin straw pallet on an iron stretcher, was placed on the damp bricks of a battery, among the guns of the fort, and surrounded by men of every degree of social culture, and every <
The Daily Dispatch: October 19, 1863., [Electronic resource], Secret history of the subjugation of Maryland. (search)
Among them we find the following bad cases: R. M. Denison, 4; J. W. Dennis, 4; John B. Brown, 4; G. W. Goldsborough, 4; Barnes Compton, 3; H. M. Warfield, 3; T. Parkin Scott, 3; S. Teackle Wallis, 3; W. H. Legg, 3; G. Kilborn, 3. In the Senate — Franklin Whittaker, 4; Coleman Yellott, 4; Thos. J. McKaig, 3; Teagle Townshend, 3. merset, James U. Dennis; Talbot, Alexander Chaplain, J. Lawrence Jones; Washington, Martin Eakle, John C. Brining; Worcester, George W. Landing. Wallis, Pitt, Scott, Sangston, Morfit, Winans, Thomas, Harrison, and Warfield, of Baltimore city, and Dennison and Quinlan, of Baltimore county, are in custody. The list I markedto Gen. Banks: This man has been more than two months passing through secession counties in our State, and has been in Virginia. He is now employed by Lieut.-Gen. Scott in lower Potomac counties. What I desire is, that you be so kind as to write Hon. S. Cameron, Secretary of War, and say that you think this man Howard shall