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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 20 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 17: events in and near the National Capital. (search)
liam Burns, held a meeting in Monument Square. T. Parkins Scott presided. He and others addressed a multitudeants. Already the Capitol had been fortified by General Scott. The doors and windows were barricaded with boas were given for Bunker Hill, Old Massachusetts, General Scott, and Major Anderson, as the regiment went up Walr on the morning of the 20th. The President and General Scott had already been in consultation on the subject t ten o'clock in the morning. At that interview General Scott proposed to bring troops by water to Annapolis, ediately returned to the President, who summoned General Scott and some of the members of the Cabinet to a confille should be sent back to York or Harrisburg. General Scott, said the Mayor in his report, adopted the Presitate; and, on the 20th, in a letter addressed to General Scott, from his beautiful seat of Arlington House, on e following is a copy of Colonel Lee's letter to General Scott:-- Arlington House, April 20, 1861. Gene
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 18: the Capital secured.--Maryland secessionists Subdued.--contributions by the people. (search)
unishment had been awarded, and, I believe, no arrests had been made for these atrocious crimes; In the Maryland Legislature, S. T. Wallis moved--That the measures adopted and conduct pursued by the authorities of the City of Baltimore, on Friday, the 19th of April, and since that time, be, and the same are hereby, made valid by the General Assembly. This would cover the conspirators and their tools, the mob, from punishment. In furtherance of this project for shielding the guilty, T. Parkins Scott proposed, in the same body, a bill to suspend the operations of the; criminal laws, and that the Grand Jury should be stopped from finding indictments against any of the offenders.--Baltimore Clipper, June 28, 1861. supplies of provisions intended for this garrison had been stopped; the intention to capture this fort had been boldly proclaimed; your most public thoroughfares were daily patrolled by large numbers of troops, armed and clothed, at least in part, with articles stolen from t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, State of. (search)
mob in Baltimore, who were members of the legislature, proposed laws to shield the rioters from harm. S. T. Wallis proposed for that purpose, That the measures adopted and conduct pursued by the authorities of the city of Baltimore on Friday, April 19, and since that time, be and the same are hereby made valid by the General Assembly. This would cover the disloyal acts of the mayor, the chief of police, the murderous rioters, and the bridge-burners. To further shield the offenders, T. Parkins Scott offered in the same body a bill to suspend the operations of the criminal laws, and that the grand jury should be estopped from finding indictments against any of the offenders. These measures. alarmed the best friends of the commonwealth, and added strength to the sympathy for the Union cause in that State. When General Butler, by a single, bold stroke, revealed the real weakness of the Confederate element in Maryland, the Unionists breathed freer, and very soon manifested their str
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Meade, George Gordon 1815-1872 (search)
Meade, George Gordon 1815-1872 Military officer; born in Cadiz, Spain, Dec. 31, 1815; graduated at West Point in 1835, served in the war with the Seminoles, and resigned from the army in 1836. He practised civil engineering until May, 1842, when he was appointed a second lieutenant of topographical engineers, serving through the war against Mexico, attached to the staff, first of General Taylor, and then of General Scott. The citizens of Philadelphia presented him with an elegant sword on his return from Mexico. In the summer of 1861 he was made a brigadier-general of volunteers, having been in charge of the surveys on the northern lakes until that year as captain of engineers. He was in the Army of the Potomac, active and efficient, from 1861 until the close of the war. In June, 1862, he was made major-general of volunteers, and was in command of the Army of the Potomac in the summer of 1863. On July 1, 2, and 3, of that year he fought the decisive battle of Gettysburg. I