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John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 101 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 2 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 3 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Robert N. Scott or search for Robert N. Scott in all documents.

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Florida, along the coasts, and within the sounds, rivers, and harbors of this watershed. As an actuality, two centres of operations existed : the one at Port Royal, the depot of supplies and usual headquarters of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron; the other within the sounds, and on the coast of North Carolina, over which the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron held watch. In order to avoid confusion, the events of each section are treated separately. It may be added that the writer commanded a vessel in the battle of Port Royal and in subsequent operations along that coast until May, 1863, and was also present in the two bombardments of Fort Fisher. He is under many obligations to the Navy Department, to the Chiefs of Bureau of Ordnance and Construction, and to Colonel Robert N. Scott, U. S. Army, for much valuable information not otherwise attainable, and also to several friends versed in naval and military affairs, for their kindly assistance. Washington, May, 1883.
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
d himself, and states his belief that an additional land force is absolutely required to advance operations. Fort Wagner had been silenced and its garrison driven to shelter, and that could be repeated; the rest could only be accomplished by troops. As a part of the operations against Charleston, the command of General A. H. Terry was sent up the Stono River to make a diversion. The Pawnee, Commander G. B. Balch; the McDonough, Lieutenant-Commanding Bacon; and the Marblehead, Lieutenant-Commanding Scott, were in those waters to co-operate. On the afternoon of July 9th the Pawnee, Nantucket (monitor), the McDonough, and the Williams proceeded up the Stono, anchored above Strom's Landing, and opened fire on James Island. The troops followed in transports, landed, and sent a force out on the island. On the 11th a Confederate battery opened fire on the army transport Hunter, and at once received the fire of the McDonough and the Williams. In the afternoon, at the request of Ge
illiam T., 155 Sanborn, Ensign, 149 San Jacinto, the, U. S. steamer, 7 Santiago de Cuba, the, U. S. vessel, 218, 225, 228 Seneca, the, U. S. vessel, 16, 19 et seq., 23, 25, 29, 33, 35, 38 et seq., 43 et seq., 50, 69 et seq., 84, 89, 128, 217, 228, 242 Saratoga, the, U. S. sloop, 150 Sassacus, the, 204, 207 et seq., 218, 228, 242 et seq. Saugus, the, 229 Savannah. 11; menaced, 47 et seq., 88, 153 et seq. Schimmelfenning, General, 149 Schofield, General, 242 Scott, Lieutenant--Commanding, 129 Scroggs, Lieutenant, 185, 192 Sea Bird, the, Confederate ship, 184 et seq. Selfridge, Commander, 233 Seminole, the, U. S. steamer, 7, 21, 28 et seq., 49 Semmes, Lieutenant-Commanding A. A., 64 Seymour, the, 181, 183, 205 Sharpe, Lieutenant, 170 Shawmut, the, 242 Shawsheen the, 177, 181, 183, 186, 194, 196 et seq. Shenandoah, the, 156, 217, 228 Sherman, General T. W., 14, 17 (note); his report on Port Royal expedition, 32 et seq