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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for T. J. Scott or search for T. J. Scott in all documents.

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eat intrepidity in charging through an open field under a very heavy and well-directed fire. With noble spirit the men reformed, and advanced again to the hopeless slaughter. In fifteen minutes, in the second charge, half the command that was left fell killed or wounded. Conspicuous was Col. J. C. Lewis, who fell mortally wounded at the head of his regiment, within a few paces of the enemy. Others who fell within arm's reach of the trenches were Capt. S. Aycock, Capt. R. P. Oliver, Lieut. T. J. Scott and Lieut. Morgan Edwards. The Fourth, under Colonel Hunter, made a gallant assault, striking the most important part of the line, but they had not the strength alone to break it. The Twelfth Louisiana, at the battle of the 20th of July, lost II killed, 57 wounded, and 4 missing, out of 318 engaged. Capt. J. A. Bivin and Lieut. M. S. McLeroy were killed in front of the line. Maj. H. V. McCain was wounded. Lieut.-Col. T. C. Standifer and Sergt.-Maj. H. Brunner were honorably men
Chapter 19: The Tennessee campaign under Hood Scott's brigade at Franklin the Washington artillery at Murfreesboro battle of Nashville the retreat the Louisiana brigade in the rear Guard last days of the army of Tennessee. Hood having failed to draw Sherman into Tennessee, Beauregard, now close at hand, was stirring him to a bold stroke. General Beauregard had been assigned on October 2, 1864, to the department of the West, including the department commanded by Hood and that of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana, to which Lieut.-Gen. Richard Taylor had been assigned. Neither of the subaltern commanders was displeased at the selection of Beauregard, who had but lately stepped from the masterly defense of Charleston. It was not a promotion for G. T. Beauregard, only a new field in which to show his tact and rich military experience. This was nothing less than to give a fatal blow to Thomas, organizing at Nashville. Hood willingly undertook the enterpris