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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 73 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 56 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 51 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 46 4 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 43 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 43 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 32 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Walter Scott or search for Walter Scott in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
d had been taken prisoners, among whom Sir Robert Spotswood was one, a worthy, honest, loyal gentleman, and as wise a man as that nation had at that time (whom the King had made secretary of the State of that Kingdom). She once read to me Sir Walter Scott's account of Sir Robert Spotswood's execution; and I well remember how her eyes indignantly flashed, when she came to Sir Robert's calm, but withering reply to the canting Puritan minister, who interrupted his last devotions. With the excep release. In 1189 David was present at the coronation of Richard I, and the following year he accompanied this Prince to Syria, where he distinguished himself at the siege of Acre, and in other military operations. He is the Sir Kenneth in Sir Walter Scott's Talisman. He died in 1219. He married Maud, daughter of Hugh Kivilioch, Earl of Chester. Their second daughter, VI.--Isabel, married Robert de Brus, Lord of Annandale, the fourth in descent from Robert de Brus, a noble Norman knight,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Kirby Smith's campaign in Kentucky in 1862. (search)
n army at Cumberland Gap. Our cavalry under Col. Scott, which entered Kentucky by the Jamestown roasoldiers subsisted on beef and roasting ears. Scott had captured some sutlers stores and a large ne river General Smith received dispatches from Scott, informing him that the enemy were advancing id be held, and Cleburne was ordered to move to Scott's assistance as rapidly as the condition of hi was first fully appreciated the importance of Scott's victory a few days previous. Numerous positon a sharp cavalry skirmish occurred, in which Scott was forced to abandon one of his guns. The enith now felt confident of victory, and ordered Scott to press forward with his cavalry, by a route ght, without water. It was necessary that Colonel Scott should be allowed time to get in the rear nd the enemy were left to be dealt with by Colonel Scott. That officer having reached the Lexingtoen upon the field, we only 5,500, exclusive of Scott's cavalry. Our loss in killed and wounded did[3 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Raid of Captain Wm. Miles Hazzard on St. Simon's Island. (search)
anted in the ground. The poet, Paul H. Hayne, hearing of these courageous acts, ascertained the facts of the affair and wrote the following beautiful ode in commemoration thereof. Captain Hazzard is descended from a military family, the first of whom, William Hazzard, was a colonel in the British army. His son, Major William Whig Hazzard, was in the Continental army, and wounded at the seizure of Savannah; while his own father was a Colonel in the United States army of the date of General Scott, with whom he served. A. R. Chisholm. St. S. Church yard, St. Simon's Island, Georgia. Commandant Federal Forces at South End: Sir — I have more than once been informed through your deserted allies, that the graves of our family and friends had been desecrated by your forces after the unsuccessful attempt to capture me some months ago. This rumor I could not believe, as the custom, even of the savage, has been to respect the home of the dead. But the sight I now behold convinces me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Kirby Smith's Kentucky campaign. (search)
was just such a dash as a spirited and enterprising cavalry officer might have made. Much to our relief it proved to be Scott's cavalry, who, also, had obtained blue suits from the captured stores. An order was issued that day prohibiting the sole Hon. James B. Clay, a Secessionist, on the afternoon of the day of the battle of Richmond, the conversation turned upon Scott's raid, and the fight then supposed to be going on in the neighborhood of Richmond. James B. Clay, influenced more by hi the Hon. J. J. Crittenden and Govvernor Robinson, and that he would lay a wager that it was nothing but a raid, and that Scott was already defeated and driven beyond Big Hill. This proves the completeness of the surprise. The objective point ofral Heth came up with reinforcements, raising the effective strength of the army to 11,000 men, exclusive of Morgan's and Scott's cavalry. This was the state of affairs at the time that it was necessary for General Smith to decide upon the course