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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 73 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 56 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 51 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 46 4 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 43 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 43 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 32 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Walter Scott or search for Walter Scott in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 11 document sections:

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
using cedar is to keep out the worms and all other vermin. He talked to me a great deal about Captain Basil Hall, with whom he has a grievous quarrel This quarrel arose from the conduct of Captain Hall, during a visit to the Baroness Purgstall, an aged relative of Von Hammer,—by marriage,—who lived in Styria; and his account of her domestic life in a book entitled Schloss Hainfeld, or a Winter in Styria. The Baroness Purgstall was a native of Scotland, and appears in Lockhart's Life of Scott, under her maiden name, as Miss Cranstoun. Von Hammer, who inherited a portion of her estate, and added the name of Purgstall to his own, published an answer to Captain Hall's work. . . . . I visited, too, Kaltenbaeck, the editor of the Austrian periodical for History and Statistics. He was immersed in papers and books, and complained bitterly of the trouble given him by the merely mechanical restraints imposed by the censorship, which take up, it seems, a great deal of his time to no p
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
k Guizot in my carriage to Mad. de Broglie's, where we had, en tres petit comite, a very gay and brilliant talk, partly political and partly literary, in which the generally degraded tone of French letters at the present time was not spared. On my way home I stopped at the Duchess de Rauzan's, where there were heaps of Carlists, the Bethunes, the Crillons, the Circourts, Count Bastard, . . . . and among the rest Jusuf, with his picturesque costume, and that sort of spare Arab beauty which Scott has given to Saladin in the Crusaders. . . . Berryer was there, and brilliant. March 4.—. . . . I was tired in the evening, but went to Thiers', where, with a few other distinguished persons, chiefly politicians, I met Cousin, Villemain, and Mignet, and had a very agreeable talk. Cousin, however, I like as little as any man of letters I have seen. He has a falsetto, and a pretension with his vanity, that takes away much of the pleasure his talent and earnestness would give . . . . M
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
mmon prejudices, at least . . . April 7.—We made a most delightful visit to Miss Joanna Baillie. . . . . She talked of Scott with a tender enthusiasm that was contagious, and of Lockhart with a kindness that is uncommon when coupled with his namebenevolence. It is very rare that old age, or, indeed, any age, is found so winning and agreeable. I do not wonder that Scott in his letters treats her with more deference, and writes to her with more care and beauty, than to any other of his corrence from home. Felix qui potuit. The party to-day consisted of Empson; Richardson, so much mentioned by Lockhart as Scott's friend; Mackenzie, son of the Man, of Feeling, long Secretary-General in India; Phillips, Thomas J. Phillips, mentioishments, and by the consideration he enjoys in society. Of course, it was very agreeable. We talked about Scotland and Scott; about Lockhart, with whom Murchison is very intimate; about India, Rome, Bunsen, and the Archbishop of Cologne; about Am
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
volume of Lockhart's Life, with the account of Scott's pecuniary troubles, and their tragical resuld his works . . . . Already what relates to Scott himself is more curious than all he collected tle disconcerted to find that he lives in what Scott so mournfully calls poor 39, the very house inin 1819. . . . . I was received up stairs in Mrs. Scott's drawing-rooms, fitted up for a bachelor anck with the fresh admiration she expressed for Scott's memory . . . . . She is certainly a remarkab is placed that the Edinburgh monument to Sir Walter Scott shall be what it ought to be; but the resalmost incredible. But Niebuhr had it; so had Scott, and so has Humboldt; four examples—including s genial talk, for I cannot help agreeing with Scott, that he is the most agreeable man I have eversensibility when speaking of his last visit to Scott, which he said he was obliged to shorten in orall these Ravensworths are remarkable people. Scott's visit to them, which he so well describes, s[5 more...]
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
have been produced in no other than this state of things, are men who would be valued in any state of society in the world, and contribute materially to render its daily intercourse agreeable. . . . . . . . . Among the books republished here, and of which more copies have been sold in America than were sold of the original edition in England, is Lockhart's Life of Sir Walter, about which you ask. It is a most interesting book, and has greatly interested the multitudes here, who feel that Scott belongs to us as he does to you, and who thank God that Milton's language is our mother-tongue, and Shakespeare's name compatriot with our own. But the ocean that rolls between us operates like the grave on all personal and party feelings; and our thoughts and feelings towards such as Sir Walter and yourself are as impartial, at least, if not as wise and decisive, as the voice of posterity. We were, therefore, pained by some parts of this book . . . . To the admirers of Sir Walter in Americ
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
e you may, perhaps, be curious touching our whereabouts; and if you are not, I have some mind to give you an account of what we have done since I saw you last, and what we propose to do, peradventure, in the course of the next two or three weeks. Our first hit was Niagara, and a very happy one, as it turned out. We spent ten days on the American side, . . . . but the Lundy's Lane gathering approached, A political meeting connected with the Presidential election and the candidacy of General Scott. and we moved over to the other side, where we passed twelve days most agreeably, in a nice comfortable cottage. . . . . It satisfied all my expectations of Niagara,—the views, the walks, the drives, and above all certain excursions by the full moon on the river, where we rowed about in front of the American Falls, keeping partly in their shade, till the water seemed to rush over like sparkling molten silver, or like a line of living fire, jumping and dancing for a moment on the perilous
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
o Mrs. Ticknor. Harrow. British Museum reading-room. anecdote of Scott. W. R. Greg. Tocqueille. MacAULAYulay. Wilson. Spanish studiesce of affectionate messages. I talked a good deal with Richardson, Scott's old friend, who appears so largely and pleasantly in the Life by Lockhart. . . . . Telling him how fine I thought Scott's colloquial powers, he answered, Yes, but they were never so fine as when he was having remained for them but to carry him up stairs and put him to bed. Scott, however, was neither disturbed nor exhausted, and they two repairee village tavern, and ordering beefsteaks and hot brandy-and-water, Scott poured out floods of anecdote and poetry, and talked on till three, Tom came over to them, a little the worse for wear, but not much. Scott talked on, more brilliantly, if possible, than ever. At eleven thehops and beer for breakfast, and then all three went off to London, Scott amusing them all the way, as—according to Richardson's account—men
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
t with little efficiency. We drifted. Now the rudder is felt. Maryland must yield, or become a battle-ground over which the opposing forces will roll their floods alternately. Baltimore must open her gates, or the city will be all but razed. At least, so far we seem to see ahead. But the people, the sovereign, came to the rescue at the last moment. . . . . Now the movement—partly from having been so long delayed and restrained—is become absolute and impetuous, so that twice as many troops will speedily be in Scott's hands as he will want. . . . . Meantime, I think that the moral effect of our union and vigor at the North—which was wholly unexpected. at the South—will tend to repress the Southern ardor for conquest, if not for fighting. We have never apprehended that we should be worsted in the end, and we do not now anticipate early reverses, or accidents of any consequence. We mean, on all accounts, to fight it out, once for all. . . . . Yours truly, Geo. Ti
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
table, getting from each whatever of news or indications of popular feeling might come from the front. He went frequently to Braintree to see his old friend General Thayer, whose opinion on military affairs was acknowledged during the war by General Scott, in conversation, to be the highest authority in the United States, and these visits were returned by the old General, most often at breakfast-time, his own breakfast having been taken at five or half after. From General Thayer Mr. Ticknor ry men who were often misjudged by the public. Mr. Ticknor repeatedly took regular officers of high standing on pilgrimages to the old chief at Braintree,—General Robert Anderson, General Donaldson, and others. In the summer of 1862 he met General Scott at West Point, being accidentally with him at the moment he was informed that President Lincoln was on his way to consult him; and when General McClellan visited Boston in 1863, he took great pleasure in meeting him. He talked with every one
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 25: (search)
most of its members,—who spoke of being in want of a subject for reading, asked him what book was interesting him, and, putting his hand on a volume of the Life of Scott, Mr. Ticknor said he was reading that for the fourth time; and then went on to speak of the biographies which make our knowledge of the history of English literatu of his life, and he often said, as he laid it down, that it seemed to him as fresh and interesting as in the first of his several readings of it. With the Life of Scott he continued occupied until the last, having just reached the concluding volume when his strength failed, and even then desiring to have it read to him, thus linking his last hours with those of the friend and the object of admiration of his early days. Scott, Southey, and so on, and the memoirs are so rich. With Mr. Charles Francis Adams, who visited him that evening, he had a most spirited and agreeable conversation, in the course of which he expatiated, with more force and terseness of
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