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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 73 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 56 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 51 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 46 4 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 43 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 43 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 32 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 31 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Walter Scott or search for Walter Scott in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
each of me to the 13th, 15th, 3rd and 5th Ala. regiments, before reaching the 12th Ala. April 25. Rev. F. M. Kennedy, a North Carolina chaplain, preached at Round Oak Church. It was an able sermon. General Wm. N. Pendleton had been expected, but failed to come. April 26. Sunday. Leiutenant T. W. Harris, of the 12th Georgia, and R. M. Boring (my classmate) of the 4th Georgia, came to see me, and Harris preached a fine sermon. April 27. Completed Delaware by G. P. R. James, and Walter Scott's Poems. Regiment moved to new camp. April 28. One year ago the Macon Confederates, Co. F, were re-organized while stationed at Yorktown. R. U. Keeling, J. W. McNeely and I were respectively elected captain, first and second lieutenants by a unanimous vote, and J. W. Wright third lieutenant. It was a turning point in my life. The life of a private soldier is not an enviable one, and I intend to do what I may to relieve and cheer the brave men who have by their votes promoted me fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fragments of war history relating to the coast defence of South Carolina, 1861-‘65, and the hasty preparations for the Battle of Honey Hill, November 30, 1864. (search)
hat class, as a fitting introduction to this interesting narrative: 5. William S. Rosecrans; 8. Gustavus W. Smith; 9. Mansfield Lovell; 12. Alex. P. Stewart; 16. Martin L. Smith; 17. John Pope; 24. Abner Doubleday; 28. D. H. Hill; 40. R. H. Anderson; 41. Geo. W. Lay; 48. Lafayette McLaws; 52. Earl Van Dorn; 54. James Longstreet. He was assigned to the engineer corps and stationed at West Point as assistant professor of engineering until September 24, 1846, when he took the field in General Scott's column in Mexico and served until May 22, 1848; he was breveted for gallantry at Cerro Gordo and for gallant conduct at Contreras and Cherubusco; was promoted captain of engineers. After the Mexican war he served on the coast defences. He resigned December 15, 1854, and with General Quitman, was engaged in preparations for a military expedition in Cuba, but this was abandoned. In 1856 he took charge of the large iron interests of Cooper, Hewitt & Co. at Trenton, N. J. When Fernan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Henry Chase Whiting, Major-General C. S. Army. (search)
d her hosts, Madison drafted the Constitution, Marshall interpreted the laws—Southern men all. King's Mountain and Guilford were the precursors of the inevitable close of the drama of the revolution at Yorktown. For seventy years and more Southern genius dominated the country and led it, step by step, to the pinnacle of fame. Jefferson and Jackson were the great executives of the first half of the century. The second War of Independence, in 1812, was maintained chiefly by Southern valor. Scott and Taylor, as well as Lee and Davis, in the Mexican war, were men of the South. Fought by an overwhelming majority of Southern men, that war, with the purchases previous thereto and succeeding, by Southern statesmanship, had doubled the area ruled by the Federal government, against the repeated protest of the North. The South had given to the general government, of her own accord, the princely territory of the States between the Tennessee and the Great Lakes. There was never a a conflict
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Joseph Wheeler. (search)
their fathers. It might be expected that we would find that sentiment in Virginia, the birthplace of patriots, the home of heroes, the grave of liberty's martyrs! It is a privilege to stand upon her historic soil. How overwhelmingly rush upon us thoughts of her past! Here Washington first saw the light, and Jefferson, Madison and Monroe, as they grew to manhood's prime, learned to be great, and here is enshrined their hallowed dust. Virginia gave to the world Gaines, Harrison, Taylor, Scott, Johnston, Stonewall Jackson, Stuart and the long roll of the chivalric Lees, above all, the one colossal Lee, whose fame challenges the ages from the topmost heights of glorious renown; the gallant, superb, chivalrous Robert Edward Lee, a general whose victories have no parallel in history, a man whose unblemished character stands before the world as a model of the purest virtue and highest type of manhood. Blessed be this beautiful historic city, so closely identified with his chivalrous