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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
n as Dr. John Cutler; married Mary Cowell, of Boston, and served as surgeon in King Philip's War. before mentioned, sometime physician and surgeon. Our mother was much attached to Grandma Cutler, and speaks thus of her in a sketch entitled The Elegant literature of sixty years ago : Grandma will read Owen Feltham's Resolves, albeit the print is too small for her eyes. She knows Pope and Crabbe by heart, admires Shenstone, and tells me which scenes are considered finest in this or that of Scott's novels. Calling one day upon a compeer of her own age, she was scandalized to find her occupied with a silly story called Jimmy Jessamy. Mrs. Cutler had known General Washington, and was fond of telling how at a ball the Commander-in-Chief crossed the room to speak to her. Many of her letters have been preserved, and show a sprightliness which is well borne out by her portrait, that of a charming old lady in a turban, with bright eyes and a humorous mouth. A word remains to be said
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
n a loud tone, Tom Steele, how da ye do? which drew forth bursts of applause. And is he a good man? I asked of a lady repealer (whether apple-woman or seller of ginger beer, I know not). Oh, Ma'am, he is the best cratur, the most charitable, the most virtuous, the most religious man — sure, he goes to the communion every Sunday, and never says no to no one. The visit to Scotland was all too hasty, the notes are mere brief jottings; at the end she remembered but one thing, the grave of Scott. In return for all the delight he had given me, I had nothing to give him but my silent tears. The end of July found the party once more in England. The following letter tells of the unlucky visit to Wordsworth which our mother (after forty-six years) describes from memory in her Reminiscences in slightly different terms. To her sister Louisa July 29. ... I am very glad to be out of Ireland and Scotland, where we had incessant rains — even the beautiful Loch Katrine would not show
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
ame here lately. Many of the pilgrims were peasants. They travelled from Russia on foot, wearing bark shoes, which are very yielding and soft. These Russian ladies deprecated the action of Peter the Great in building St. Petersburg, and in forcing European civilization upon his nation, when still unprepared for it. March 18. ... Drove with Maud, to get white thorn from Villa Madama. Went afterwards to Mrs. Waldo Story's reception, where met Mrs. McTavish,. youngest daughter of General Winfield Scott. I was at school with one of her older sisters, Virginia, who became a nun. As the winter wore away and the early Roman spring broke, the last vestige of the discomfort of the first weeks vanished. The daily drives to the country in search of wild flowers were an endless delight, as well as the trips to the older quarters of the city. She found that, while during the first weeks she had lost the habit of looking keenly about at the sights, the old joy soon came back to her, an
ling, F. W. J. von, I, 196. Schenectady, I, 377; II, 162. Schenskowkhan, II, 17. Scherb, Mr., I, 142. Schiller, J. C. F. von, II, 20, 169. Schlesinger, Mrs., Barthold, II, 277. Schlesinger, Sebastian, II, 171. Schliemann, Heinrich, II, 5, 43. Schliemann, Mrs., II, 5, 7, 44. Schubert, Franz, II, 20, 71, 157. Schurz, Miss, II, 65. Schwalbach, II, 172, 173. Scotland, I, 88, 91, 92; II, 71, 166. Scott, Virginia, II, 249. Scott, Walter, I, 13, 91. Scott, Winfield, II, 249. Sears, Mrs. M., II, 210. Seattle, II, 133. Seeley, J. R., I, 313, 314; II, 6. Sembrich, Marcella, II, 269. Severance, Caroline M., I, 291; II, 9. Seward, W. H., I, 192, 246. Sforza Cesarini, Duchess, II, 175, 176. Shakespeare, William, II, 262, 330. Sharp, William, II, 169. Shedlock, Miss, II, 289. Shelby, I, 377. Shelley, P. B., I, 68; II, 237. Shenandoah, I, 274. Shenstone, William, I, 13. Sherborn Prison, II, 159. Sheridan, Ph