Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Scurry or search for Scurry in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
there was a pleasant feast of reason and flow of soul We bore away with us the next morning the most delightful recollections of Galveston, as we returned to meet an engagement for that night in Houston. Here the committees of the Cotton Exchange, of the citizens generally, and of the survivors of the Army of Northern Virginia, and of Hood's old brigade, met us at the depot and escorted us to the Capitol hotel, one of the finest and most elegantly furnished in the South, where Captain Scurry had his fine company, the Light Guard, drawn up to receive the General, who passed, with his escort, through their open ranks, with uncovered head, and entered the spacious parlors where a large crowd of ladies and gentlemen were assembled to receive and greet him. In behalf of the good people of Houston, Major Wm. H. Crank made the following appropriate address of welcome, which was received with loud applause: Ladies and Gentlemen,—We are here to tender the welcome, which Texans
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
there was a pleasant feast of reason and flow of soul We bore away with us the next morning the most delightful recollections of Galveston, as we returned to meet an engagement for that night in Houston. Here the committees of the Cotton Exchange, of the citizens generally, and of the survivors of the Army of Northern Virginia, and of Hood's old brigade, met us at the depot and escorted us to the Capitol hotel, one of the finest and most elegantly furnished in the South, where Captain Scurry had his fine company, the Light Guard, drawn up to receive the General, who passed, with his escort, through their open ranks, with uncovered head, and entered the spacious parlors where a large crowd of ladies and gentlemen were assembled to receive and greet him. In behalf of the good people of Houston, Major Wm. H. Crank made the following appropriate address of welcome, which was received with loud applause: Ladies and Gentlemen,—We are here to tender the welcome, which Texans