Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James A. Seddon or search for James A. Seddon in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
Department, Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C., and of which Major General Lewis Wallace, United States Volunteers, is President, was arraigned and tried Henry Wirz. Finding—The Commission, after having maturely considered the evidence adduced, find the accused guilty, as follows: Of specification to Charge 1, guilty, after amending said specification as follows: In this, that the said Henry Wirz did combine, confederate and conspire with them, the said Jefferson Davis, James A. Seddon, Howell Cobb, John H. Winder, Richard B. Winder, Isaiah H. White, S. Reed, R. R. Stephenson, S. P. Moore,——Keer (late hospital steward at Andersonville), James Duncan, Wesley W. Turner, Benjamin Harris, and others whose names are unknown, maliciously and traitorously and in violation of the laws of war, to impair and injure the health and to destroy the lives of a large number of Federal prisoners, to-wit, 45,000 soldiers, etc. The court implicated with Wirz, President Davis and memb<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.2 (search)
never forwarded to Davis. In explanation of the matter, it has been suggested that Chandler and Winder, who had charge of all Federal prisoners, were so unfriendly that Chandler's report, which attacked Winder, was somewhat discounted by Secretary Seddon and turned over to Winder for explanation. Further, the record shows that Seddon had, before the Chandler report reached him, issued orders to move some of the prisoners from Andersonville. In the first letter, in saying that the United Seddon had, before the Chandler report reached him, issued orders to move some of the prisoners from Andersonville. In the first letter, in saying that the United States authorities are to blame, Mr. Davis was referring to the refusal of General Grant to exchange prisoners with General Lee. Grant said: If we commence a system of exchange which liberates all prisoners taken we shall have to fight on until the whole South is exterminated. If we hold those caught, they amount to no more than dead men. In regard to Stanton's report, Mr. Davis had in mind those statistics which he later gave in his book, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. F