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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sedgwick, Catherine Maria 1789- (search)
Sedgwick, Catherine Maria 1789- Educator; born in Stockbridge, Mass., Dec. 28, 1789; and conducted a private school for fifty years. Her publications include A New England tale; Hope Leslie, or early times in Massachusetts (2 volumes ); The Linwoods, or sixty years since in America, etc. She died near Roxbury, Mass., July 31, 1867.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
American novel. the influence of the frontier. the sections celebrated by the romancers. John Neal. Mrs. Child. Miss Sedgwick. D. P. Thompson. Paulding. Bird. Kennedy. Judge Beverley Tucker. Caruthers. William Gilmore Simms. his devotie year, but during the second quarter of the century Cooper had many helpers in his great task. In New England Neal, Miss Sedgwick, Mrs. Child, and D. P. Thompson had already set outposts before Hawthorne came to capture that section for classic gr a bad education and uncritical times. Equally unread, as novelists, are two other writers famous in their day, Catherine Maria Sedgwick (1789-1867) and Lydia Maria Child (1802-80), who, through long and busily useful years, touched fiction here and Less gifted than Neal, both had greater charm. Mrs. Child is remembered for her devoted opposition to slavery, but Miss Sedgwick was the more important novelist. Redwood (1824), Hope Leslie (1827), and The Linwoods (1835), her best and most popu
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, A Glossary of Important Contributors to American Literature (search)
1876); Men and manners in America (1876); Stories and romances (1880); The children's book (1881); Boston town (1881); Life of Noah Webster (1882); History of the United States (1884); Men and letters (1888). He assisted Mrs. Taylor with Life and letters of Bayard Taylor (1884); and was editor of the series of Cambridge poets, and otherwise responsible for the making of many good books. His latest work was the Life of Lowell (1901). He died in Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 11, 1902. Sedgwick, Catherine Maria Born in Stockbridge, Mass., Dec. 28, 1789. Having an excellent education, she kept a private school for young ladies. Her first two novels appeared anonymously, and were entitled A New England tale (1822) and Redwood (1824). Then came The Traveller (1825); Hope Leslie, or early times in Massachusetts (2 vols., 1827); The Linwoods, or sixty years since in America (2 vols., 1835); Sketches and tales (1835); The poor rich man and the rich poor man (1836); Live and let live (1837)